REVISED WHITE PAPER ON ARTS, CULTURE AND HERITAGE

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FOREWORD BY THE MINISTER
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INTRODUCTION BY THE DEPUTY MINISTER
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PREAMBLE BY THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL
“The new vision of arts and culture goes beyond social cohesion and nourishing the soul of the nation. We believe that arts, culture and heritage play a pivotal role in the economic empowerment and skills development of a people.”
Minister P. Mashatile (2011)Revised White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage
Final Version (October 2013)
Table of Contents
ACRONYMS ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4
LIST OF TABLES ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 6
LIST OF DIAGRAMS …………………………………………………………………………………………… 6                      REWORD BY THE MINISTER …………………………………………………………………………….7
INTRODUCTION BY THE DEPUTY MINISTER ………………………………………………… 8
PREAMBLE BY THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL ……………………………………………………… 9
PART 1 – CONTEXT……………………………………………………………………………………………. 12
1 DEFINITION OF ARTS, CULTURE, HERITAGE AND THE CULTURAL AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES…………………. 13
1.1 Arts is … ‘expressing ourselves’ ……………………………………………………………………… 13
1.2 Culture is … ‘who we are’ ……………………………………………………………………………….. 13
1.3 Heritage is … ‘our shared inheritance’…………………………………………………………….. 13
1.4 Cultural and Creative Industries is…. ‘the socio-economy of ACH’ …………………. 14
2 ACH UNDER APARTHEID RULE……………………………………………………………………… 15
3 OPENING THE DOORS OF CULTURE……………………………………………………………….16
4 ADVANCING ACH AND THE CULTURAL AND CREATIVE  INDUSTRIES……….18
5 CONSTITUTIONAL AND LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK …………………………………. 21
6 MORE ACH DEFINITIONS ……………………………………………………………………………….. 22
PART 2 – PURPOSE, SCOPE AND KEY PRINCIPLES ………………………………………….. 27
7 PURPOSE …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 28
8 SCOPE …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………28
9 KEY PRINCIPLES ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 29
PART 3 – VISION AND OUTCOMES …………………………………………………………………….. 31
10 VISION ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 32
11 OUTCOMES ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 32
PART 4 – ARTS, CULTURE AND HERITAGE: A HUMAN RIGHT, AND THE FOUNDATION OF SOCIO-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT …………………………………………………………………… 33
12 THE RIGHT TO ARTS, CULTURE AND HERITAGE………………………………………… 34
13 DEVELOPING AN INCLUSIVE, COHESIVE, CARING AND PROUD SOCIETY…35
14 GROWING SOUTH AFRICA’S ECONOMY AND CREATING DECENT WORK….. 37           STRATEGIC APPROACH TO ADVANCING ACH AND THE CULTURAL AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES …………. 41
15 OVER-ARCHING APPROACH ……………………………………………………………………………. 42
15.1 Creating a Better Life For All Through Socio-Economic Development ………………. 42
15.2 Providing Integrated and Holistic Support to ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries …………………… 44
15.3 Mainstreaming Transversal Matters ………………………………………………………………… 46
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PART 6 – STRATEGIC LEVERS FOR ADVANCING ACH AND THE CULTURAL AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES …………….. 47
16 STRATEGIC LEVERS ARE………………………………………………………………………………….. 48
16.1 An Enabling Policy, Legislative and Regulatory Environment ……………………………. 50
16.2 Transformation of ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries …………………….. 51
16.3 Infrastructure Development and Maintenance ………………………………………………….. 53
16.4 Governance and Implementation Institutions …………………………………………………… 54
16.5 Cultural and Creative Industries Fund (CCIF) ………………………………………………….. 59
16.6 Cultural Diplomacy ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 62                    Skills Development and Arts Education ……………………………………………………………………. 64
16.8 ACH Sector Strategies and Plans……………………………………………………………………….. 66                        Planning ACH and the Creative and Cultural Industries …………………………………………… 72
PART 7 – ROLES AND   RESPONSIBILITIES…………………………………………………………..  74
17 OVERVIEW OF ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES …………………………………………….. 75
17.1 THE DAC ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 75
17.2 The Minister and Deputy-Minister of the DAC …………………………………………………… 76
17.3 MINMEC ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 76
17.4 Technical Management Committee ……………………………………………………………………… 77
17.5 Provincial and Local Government ………………………………………………………………………… 77
17.6 DAC’s Implementation Institutions ……………………………………………………………………… 78
17.7 Provincial and Local Government ………………………………………………………………………… 78
17.8 Properly Constituted ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries Organisations …… 78
17.9 Private Sector Partners ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 79
17.10 Educational Institutions …………………………………………………………………………………….. 79
17.11 Other Line Function Departments in all 3 Spheres of Government ……………………. 80
PART 8 – MONITORING AND EVALUATION ………………………………………………………….. 81
18 LEVELS OF MONITORING AND EVALUATION (M & E) …………………………………….. 82
ANNEXURE A ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 86
NATIONAL ACH IMPLEMENTATION PLAN…………………………………………………………….. 86
Revised White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage
ACRONYMS
ACH Arts, Culture and Heritage
ACP African, Caribbean and Pacific States
ACTAG Arts and Culture Task Group
ANC African National Congress
BB BEE Broad Based Black Economic Empowerment
CCIF Cultural and Creative Industries Fund
CEO Chief Executive Officer
DAC Department of Arts and Culture
DEAT Department of Environmental Affairs
DHE Department of Higher Education
DoBE Department of Basic Education
DoL Department of Labour
DTI Department of Trade and Industry
EPWP Expanded Public Works Programme
FCS Framework for Cultural Statistics (UNESCO)
FET Further Education and Training
FET Further Education and Training
HOD Head of Department (Province)
IPAP2 Industrial Policy Action Plan 2
M & E Monitoring and Evaluation
MEC Member of Executive Council (Provincial Government)
MGE Mzansi Golden Economy
MinMEC Minister and MEC Committee
MICE Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Exhibitions
MMC Member of Mayoral Committee (Local Government)
NAC National Arts Council
NDP National Development Plan
NGP New Growth Path
NHC National Heritage Council
NMC National Monuments Council
NQF National Qualifications Framework
RDP Reconstruction and Development Programme
PHRA Provincial Resource Heritage Agency
SAGNC South African Geographical Names Council
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SAHRA South African Heritage Resources Agency
SARS South African Revenue Services
SAQA South African Qualifications Authority
SETA Sector Education Training Authority
SMME Small, Medium and Micro Enterprise
SRSA Sport and Recreation South Africa
TIC Technical Implementation Committee
TPSA Technical Production Services Association
TRIPS Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights
UNCTAD United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
UNESCO United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization
WIPO World Intellectual Property Organisation
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List of Tables
Table 1: ACH Definitions ……………………………………………………………………………….. 22
Table 2: Objective, Outcome/s and Outputs – Enabling Policy, Legislative and Regulatory Environment Strategic Lever ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 50
Table 3: Objective, Outcome/s and Outputs-Transformation of ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries Strategic Lever ………………………………………………………………………………. 52
Table 4: Objective, Outcome/s and Outputs – Infrastructure Development and Maintenance Strategic Lever ……… 53
Table 5: South African categorization of Cultural and Creative Industries …………. 56
Table 6: Objective, Outcomes and Outputs – Governance and Implementation Institutions Strategic Lever ………… 58
Table 7: Objective, Outcome/s and Output- Cultural and Creative Industries Fund Strategic Lever …………………….. 61
Table 8: Objective, Outcomes and Outputs – Cultural Diplomacy Strategic Lever ……………………………………………… 64
Table 9: Objective, Outcome/s and Output- Skill Development and Arts Education Strategic Lever ……………………. 66
Table 10: Objective, Outcomes and Outputs- ACH Sector Strategies and Plans Strategic Lever ………………………….. 71
Table 11: Objective, Outcome/s and Outputs- Sustaining ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries Strategic Lever ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 73
Table 12: ACH Outcomes and their High Level Broad Indicators ………………………… 83
LIST OF DIAGRAMS
Figure 1: Characteristics of a Cohesive and Unified Society ……………………………… 37
Figure 2: Cultural and Creative Industries Cycle of Activities ………………………….. 44
Figure 3: Strategic Levers ……………………………………………………………………………….. 49
Figure 4: DAC’s National Implementing Institutions and the CCIF ………………….. 57
Figure 5: Example of the structure of a National Institution …………………………….. 58
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FOREWORD BY THE MINISTER
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INTRODUCTION BY THE DEPUTY MINISTER
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PREAMBLE BY THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL
“The new vision of arts and culture goes beyond social cohesion and nourishing the soul of the nation. We believe that arts, culture and heritage play a pivotal role in the economic empowerment and skills development of a people.”
Minister P. Mashatile (2011)
This revised White Paper (White Paper) on Arts, Culture and Heritage (ACH) conveys government’s current vision for ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries; as expressed above. It also revokes elements of the 1996 White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage that are outdated and out-of-sync with the present approach of developing ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries to increase its contribution to addressing the country’s triple challenges of unemployment, poverty and inequality.
The vision has emerged and is informed by various intensive consultative processes and meetings with role-players involved in ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries from late 2010 to date. The processes and meetings have been convened and attended by Minister Mashatile and Deputy Minister Phaahla of the DAC; their advisors; senior managers and other relevant staff of the Department of Arts and Culture (DAC). A specific consultation session was held with the Chief Executive Officers’ (CEO) of DAC’s agencies and councils. Provincial Members of Executive Councils (MECs) responsible for Arts and Culture and their respective Heads of Department (HOD) provided valuable input at a special Minister and MEC’s (MinMEC) meeting convened for this purpose. A draft version of the White Paper was discussed at a meeting of provincial HOD’s responsible for ACH and senior management of the DAC. Role-players from the ACH sector also participated in consultative sessions, and provided verbal and written input, on draft versions of the White Paper.
In building up to revising the White Paper, the DAC, guided by the political and strategic leadership of its Minister and Deputy Minister, held two (2) significant national consultative processes; i.e. the Mzansi’s Golden Economy Conference and the Building a Socially Cohesive and Caring Society Conference. The attendance of representatives of the ACH sector and the Cultural and Creative Industries exceeded expectations and collectively a minimum of 1600 sector representatives participated in charting the way forward for ACH and the Creative and Cultural Industries to successfully perform its dual socio-economic development role. The policy related contributions of representatives at both national consultative conferences form the substance of this revised White Paper. Similarly, policy contributions from specific ACH sub-sectors communicated in meetings held with the Minister and Deputy Minister have been incorporated, as well as policy content reflected within various reports of engagements with the sector and policy review reports – some of which date back to 2009.
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The consultations generated a wide range of ideas and views. Some of these were policy specific, some focused on implementation and others drilled down to specific sub-sectors of ACH. Policy matters relevant to South Africa’s context and approach have been incorporated, where possible, in this revised White Paper. Implementation focused proposals have been incorporated into the implementation plan of the White Paper and the sector-specific information will be included in sector specific strategies to be developed after the adoption of this White Paper which will provide the policy framework for all strategies.
Essentially, this revised White Paper encapsulates Government’s policy stance in terms of:
 Strategically re-positioning the role of the DAC in delivering ACH to all – within the context and ambit of a developmental state; and in partnership with other role-players involved in and with ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries;
 Transforming the approach, institutional structures and processes for equitably delivery of ACH;
 Transforming the demographic profiles of ACH institutions and the Cultural and Creative Industries – across all sectors of society and all the value chain activities of ACH;
 Addressing the complex set of persistent challenges that beset ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries;
 Maximizing the developmental socio-economic opportunities that exist within ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries;
 Ensuring that as many South Africans as possible have access to, and enjoy the ACH offerings of our country;
 Facilitating and supporting the involvement of South Africa’s Cultural and Creative Industries in the global arena, including across the African continent; and
 Facilitating and promoting moral regeneration.
Part 1 of the White Paper provides the context for the Revision. It includes chapters that provide a background and historical overview of ACH; describes the current status quo of ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries in the country; and lists the existing policies and legislation that inform the White Paper. It also explains the terms Arts; Culture; Heritage; and Cultural and Creative Industries in the context of this revised White Paper and provides other ACH definitions.
Arts, Culture and Heritage as a human right and a key element of socio-economic development are reflected in Part 2, and the Purpose, Scope and Key Principles of the revised White Paper is contained in Part 3. Part 4 reflects the Vision and Outcomes.
The Strategic Approach that will be applied to advancing ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries, and the Strategic Levers that will be used to drive this is contained in Parts 5 and 6 respectively.
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Part 7 highlights the main roles and responsibilities of various role-players from all sectors of society. Monitoring and evaluating the implementation of this revised White Paper is addressed in Part 8.
Annexure A is a high level implementation Plan that gives effect to this White Paper.
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PART 1 – CONTEXT
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1 DEFINITION OF ARTS, CULTURE, HERITAGE AND THE CULTURAL AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES
It must be emphasized upfront that this revised White Paper accepts that the distinctions between arts, culture and heritage, and what each of these entail and encompass are not always clearly defined and/ or specific. These divides appear to be rooted in differences in opinion rather than as fundamentally opposed paradigms; and more often than not the various definitions for a single term overlaps and fuses.
Despite these definitional difficulties inherent in the ACH landscape this revised White Paper attempts to be as exhaustive as possible in terms of stating policy positions on all elements that impact on ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries, the development of the sector and their ability to play the socio-economic role contained herein. The definitional placement of a specific area of work in this revised White Paper does not pretend or claim to be absolute in its placement but rather errs on the side of ensuring inclusivity.
1.1 Arts is … ‘expressing ourselves’
Arts refers to, but is not restricted, to all forms and traditions of dance, drama, music, film, theatre, visual arts, crafts, design, written and oral literature. It serves as means of individual and collective creativity and expression and can be conveyed through performance, execution, presentation, exhibition, transmission and study. Some of the sub-sectors of Arts are Performing Arts, Visual Arts and Music.
1.2 Culture is … ‘who we are’
Culture refers to the dynamic totality of distinctive spiritual, material, intellectual, emotional features and aesthetic features that characterises a society or social group. It includes arts and heritage, as well as modes of life, ideas, worldviews, fundamental rights of human beings, value systems, traditions and beliefs. It finds expression in the behavior, relationships and other forms of social, political and economic interaction of individuals and social groups. Culture is developed over time and subject to change. Some of the sub-sectors of Culture are drama, dance, language and indigenous art.
1.3 Heritage is … ‘our shared inheritance’
Heritage is our shared inheritance received from past generations and passed on to present and future generations. It is an expression of the traditions, customs, rituals, practices, beliefs and legacies that is practiced by and transferred from generation to generation. Heritage, both tangible and intangible/living heritage, provides the basis for a shared culture and creativity in the arts. The DAC, in its 2009 First Draft National Policy on South African Living Heritage defines Living Heritage as “cultural
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expressions and practices that form a body of knowledge and provide for continuity, dynamism, and meaning of social life to generations of people as individuals, social groups, and communities. Living heritage allows for identity and a sense of belonging for people as well as an accumulation of intellectual capital for current and future generations in the context of mutual respect for human, social, and cultural rights”.
According to the National Heritage Resources Act 25 of 1999, heritage resources means any place or object of cultural significance such as buildings and structures, landscapes and natural features, geological sites of scientific and cultural importance and, “places to which oral traditions are attached or which are associated with living heritage.” Some of the sub-sectors of Heritage are National Symbols, Orders and Heraldry, Libraries and Information Services and Museums.
1.4 Cultural and Creative Industries is…. ‘the socio-economy of ACH’
Defining “creative industries”, however, is a matter of considerable inconsistency and disagreement in the academic literature and in policymaking circles, especially in relation to the parallel concept of “cultural industries”. Sometimes a distinction is made between the creative and the cultural industries; at other times the two terms are used interchangeably.
United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD),
Creative Economy Report 2010, Creative Economy: A feasible Development Option
For the reasons reflected above, the DAC, in this revised White Paper utilizes the term “Cultural and Creative Industries” as an all-encompassing term – for the developmental role of the ACH sector and as inclusive of the definitions of ‘cultural industries’ and ‘creative industries’ offered in the 2010 UNCTAD Creative Economy Report.
According to the afore-mentioned Report:
 The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) regard the ‘cultural industries’ as those that “combine the creation, production and commercialization of contents which are intangible and cultural in nature. These contents are typically protected by copyright and they can take the form of goods or services”; and are “central in promoting and maintaining cultural diversity and in ensuring democratic access to culture”.
 UNCTAD’s approach to the ‘creative industries’ extends the concept of creativity from its strong artistic element to include “any economic activity producing symbolic products with a heavy reliance on intellectual property and for as wide a market as possible”.
The Report further states that the “Creative industries are vast in scope, dealing with the interplay of various sectors. These creative sectors range from activities rooted in traditional knowledge and cultural
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heritage such as art crafts, and cultural festivities, to more technology and services-oriented subgroups such as audiovisuals and the new media”.
The use of the combined term “Cultural and Creative Industries” is not unique to South Africa. For example, the United Kingdom (UK) uses both terms, i.e. ‘Cultural and Creative Industries’. France on the other hand uses the term ‘Cultural Industries’; Nordic countries use the term ‘The Experience Economy’; and the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States (ACP) use the term ‘Cultural Industries’ in their 2003 Dakar Declaration on the Promotion of ACP Cultural Industries.
Nor is the term being introduced for the first time in this revised White Paper. In 2005 the Gauteng Provincial Government (GPG) adopted a Cultural and Creative Industries Development Framework, and in 2008 the Department of Labour published a research report entitled ‘The Cultural and Creative Industries in South Africa’. More recently, the DAC’s 2010 Mzansi Golden Economy (MGE) Strategy also refers to the Cultural and Creative Industries in recognition of the different ways in which ACH contribute to the economy, as an economic sector, in addition to its “traditional” social development role.
2 ACH UNDER APARTHEID RULE…
The ACH sector, or the Cultural and Creative Industries as it is now referred to, was as affected by apartheid laws as all other aspects of human, social, political and economic life of people. Skewed allocation of financial resources; infrastructure and skills development between white and black South Africans beset the sector resulting in the promotion and development of some cultures over others. Artistic expressions, the culture and the heritage of the vast majority of black South Africans was distorted at best and suppressed at worst.
Culture was considered an “own affair” and as such was located under racially divided education departments in the tri-cameral and homeland systems of governance. The then Department of National Education funded cultural institutions that supposedly served audiences across the racial divide. However, these institutions were inevitably located in white areas and thus primarily served white audiences. Most Arts, Culture and Heritage institutions were, and remain located in major cities. Prior to democracy, the laws of apartheid such as the Group Areas Act, relegated most of those who were referred to as non-white communities, to living spaces at long distances from the cities, rendering their access to ACH opportunities and activities almost impossible. The education system of blacks did not offer arts education and there were limited job opportunities in the Cultural and Creative Industries for black people.
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Very importantly, the general social and class differences between black and white South Africans resulted in white dominance and monopoly of the Cultural and Creative Industries value chain of activities. Put simply, the effect of apartheid policies on ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries is that the majority of the institutions operating within the ACH value chain was, and continues to be, white dominated at ownership, management and operational levels. Post-apartheid South Africa has seen tangible and quantitative increases in the participation of previously disadvantage groups in the Creation element of the ACH Value Chain. However, for reasons ranging from skewed skill development practices of the apartheid era to a narrow understanding of the role of the Cultural and Creative Industries since 1994, the active and sustainable involvement of previously disadvantaged individuals at all institutional levels and in all activities of the ACH value chain i.e. creation, production, dissemination, transmission and consumption; has yet to be achieved.
The impact of apartheid on ACH is aptly captured in the African National Congress’s (ANC) Draft National Cultural Policy which states that:
“Colonialism and apartheid neglected, distorted and suppressed the culture of the majority of South Africans. The freedom of expression was destroyed and systematic efforts were made at stifling creativity. Communities were denied resources and facilities to develop their own cultural expressions, unless they coincided with the aims of the colonial masters. The absence of an effective educational system, high rates of illiteracy and extreme poverty compounded the cultural deprivation of the majority”.
3 OPENING THE DOORS OF CULTURE…
Two years into democratic governance, in 1996, Government adopted the White Paper on Arts and Culture and Heritage (the 1996 White Paper). The status quo inherited by South Africa’s democratic government is summed up in the following statement from Chapter 2 of the 1996 White Paper: “The current arts and culture dispensation still largely reflects the apartheid era in the distribution of skills, access to public resources, geographical location of arts infrastructure and the governance, management and staffing of publicly-funded arts institutions”. The policy stance to address this legacy is articulated, also in Chapter 2 of the 1996 White Paper as “The implications of this are manifold. No government can legislate creativity into effect. At best government can seek to ensure that its resources are used equitably so that impediments to expression are removed, that the social and political climate are conducive to self-expression, and that the arts, culture and heritage allow the full diversity of our people to be expressed in a framework of equity which is committed to redressing past imbalances and facilitating the development of all of its people.”
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The 1996 White Paper describes the purpose of the then Department of Arts, Culture, Science and Technology as creating an environment conducive to the promoting, protecting and realizing the full potential of South Africa’s Cultural and Creative Industries through:
 transparent and catalytic mechanisms for distributing public funds;
 transformation of all arts and culture institutions and structures;
 redistribution, redress and access;
 human resource development: practitioners, administrators and educators;
 integration of arts and culture into all aspects of socio-economic development;
 the rights and status of practitioners; and
 sources of funding.
Statutory bodies established by the 1996 White Paper are the National Arts Council, restructured Performing Arts Councils, and the National Heritage Council including the National Monuments Council and the National Geographic Names Committee as divisions.
Since the adoption of the 1996 White Paper to date, a wide range of legislation enacts its policy intents and addresses the myriad elements that impact on and inform the role and work of the Cultural and Creative Industries. Some of the legislation, programmes and projects developed since 1996 overrides the essence of the 1996 White Paper, not as intentional disregard for the policy framework but rather as a response to changes in the political and socio-economic context and directives issued by succeeding government’s priorities; and the growing strength and contribution of the Cultural and Creative Industries in the broader agenda to transform South Africa into an equitable society.
Some of the changes that have taken place in the ensuing eighteen years have been in the composition, governance, mandates and role of ACH institutions and the Cultural and Creative Industries. For instance, the National Monuments Council (NMC) which was to be a division within the National Heritage Council (NHC) was transformed into the South African Heritage Resources Agency (SAHRA). Similarly, the 1996 White Paper provided for National Geographic Names Committee to be located within the NHC as a division; but in reality there is a South African Geographical Names Council (SAGNC), the secretariat of which resides within the DAC. The mandate for the repatriation of heritage is duplicated within two institutions, namely SAHRA and the NHC. Another very significant political and structural change that invalidates the 1996 White Paper is the separation of Science and Technology from the department, in 2004, to form another department.
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4 ADVANCING ACH AND THE CULTURAL AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES…
While many of the principles in the 1996 White Paper remain valid and critical today; the approach to, and understanding of the dynamic, progressive, developmental role of the DAC and the Cultural and Creative Industries has developed over the years.
The Vision of the 1996 White Paper emphasises “the right of all to freely practice and satisfy artistic and cultural expression, and enjoy protection and development of their heritage”. It is an emphasis that downplays the equally important social cohesion, nation building and economic development role of ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries – a role that was clearly demonstrated in the country’s hosting of the 2010 FIFA World Cup. While this international event was a sport event, it offered the Cultural and Creative Industries the opportunity to showcase, explore and further develop the country’s full array of indigenous and uniquely South African (unity in diversity) arts, culture and heritage. All sub-sectors and disciplines of the Cultural and Creative Industries participated in an eclectic range of programmes and services; rolled out throughout the country, and witnessed by millions of people worldwide. The 2010 World Cup period confirmed nationally and internationally, that high levels of unity, patriotism and prosperity, via ACH is within reach. It also confirmed that South Africa and the Continent is blessed with a wealth of ACH and that, if correctly harnessed, the Cultural and Creative Industries can engender social cohesion, enhance nation building and contribute to economic growth and development.
Additionally, the principles and approach detailed in the 1996 White Paper reduces the role of government to the development of policy and minimum standards that will guide the Cultural and Creative Industries; the transformation of ACH structures and institutions; and the distribution of public funds to the Cultural and Creative Industries. The purpose of the 1996 White Paper, in fact, centers the role of Government around funding the Cultural and Creative Industries and goes as far as stating “the draft white paper sets out government policy for establishing the optimum funding arrangements and institutional frameworks…”; and “while it is the goal of the Ministry to ensure adequate public subsidies for the arts, culture and heritage, the policy outlined in this document is located within the reality of existing budgets and the requirements for fiscal discipline.” The stated role does not encapsulate current articulations of government on its role as a developmental state. The concept of a developmental state means that government can, and will, directly support and get involved in actual delivery where this may either be lacking; not happening at all; happening but needs to be reinforced and strengthened; and is happening but at too slow a pace. These articulations cannot be ignored; nor should it be viewed as interference by government. The role of government thus goes beyond just creating the conditions in which shared socio economic development and nation building can thrive; to actively participating in ensuring the attainment of these objectives. This proactive role of government will be effected with credibility and an understanding of what it stands for, i.e. as the heart of good governance, transparency and accountability.
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The current Programme of Action of government is designed to ensure the:
 continued democratisation of our society based on equality, non-racialism and non-sexism;
 building of national unity in diversity as a source of our strength;
 building on the achievements and the experience since 1994;
 ensuring an equitable, sustainable, and inclusive socio-economic growth path that brings decent work and sustainable livelihoods;
 implementing targeted programmes for the youth, women, workers, rural masses and people with disabilities; and
 working towards a better South Africa, a better Africa and a better World.
In pursuit of this Programme of Action, Cabinet agreed on a set of twelve outcomes (or priorities) to provide a strategic focus for government, building on the five priorities in the ruling party’s election manifesto. It is in this context that the mandate of the DAC; in its 2010-2014 Medium Term Strategic Framework is reflected as being to develop and preserve South African Culture and Heritage to ensure social cohesion and nation building, and to make a meaningful contribution to the government’s objectives of creating decent work, fighting poverty and building sustainable livelihoods.
The DAC’s commitment to ensuring that it, and the Cultural and Creative Industries, contribute to shared economic growth and social cohesion is reinforced in detail in its Mzansi Golden Economy and Social Cohesion Strategies.
Furthermore, within the context of the New Growth Path (NGP) and the National Development Plan (NDP); the DAC as well as other sectors of society such as non-governmental ACH institutions and the Cultural and Creative Industries, cannot abdicate its responsibility to balance playing a leading role in nation building; building social cohesion and supporting moral regeneration as well as in creating decent work and growing the economy. In terms of this role, the DAC and the sector as a whole, must promote interventions and the development of programmes and projects that directly and indirectly contribute to addressing key social, economic and other challenges that impede the transformation of South Africa into a truly democratic, equitable and just society that respects and preserves the rights, including cultural rights, of all people.
The NGP, the concrete interventions envisaged in the Industrial Policy Action Plan 2 (IPAP 2), and the NDP provides some guidance on what could be considered as the role and contribution of ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries to socio-economic growth and development. However, the existing 1996 White Paper on ACH, understandably so as mentioned above, does not reflect and comprehensively address the current general policy approaches and imperatives of government, ACH institutions and the Creative and Cultural Industries.
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The innovative and noteworthy responses of the DAC, ACH institutions and the Cultural and Creative Industries, while commendable and necessary, has inadvertently created a new set of challenges – none of which is insurmountable. Several DAC conducted assessments, reviews and consultation reports of ACH and with the Cultural and Creative Industries in their individual areas of focus and expertise, as well as coherent and inter-linked focus areas, pinpoint a set of main generic challenges that can be categorised as the need to:
 clarify the roles and mandates of DAC in relation to its declared cultural institutions and councils; civil society, other non-governmental Cultural and Creative Industries institutions; and each sphere of government;
 determine inter-governmental and multi-sectoral mechanisms and processes that support integrated and collaborative implementation while respecting the constitutional role of each sphere of government; and the independence of the various sectors of society;
 streamline DAC’s more than 28 implementing agencies and councils to reduce duplications and overlaps in their mandates and roles;
 amend and/or revoke legislation to reflect the prevailing situation of ACH;
 make definitive policy statements that recognise, support and facilitate the role and contribution of the Cultural and Creative Industries to building social cohesion, national unity and pride; and as a key economic growth sector as listed in the country’s NGP and IPAP 2;
 increase sustainable provision of financial resources for developing and promoting the Cultural and Creative Industries;
 implement, monitor and evaluate visible outcomes-based programmes and projects that are accessible to the entire spectrum of South African society in general, and previously disadvantaged communities and individuals in particular;
 up-skill and increase the professional and technical human resource capacity and abilities in direct Cultural and Creative Industries fields as well as indispensable ACH support functions.
 promote and support ACH as a viable and sustainable long-term career sector and business choice;
 re-introduce and support ACH studies into the curriculum of schools at primary and secondary levels;
 expand ACH study opportunities, at tertiary education level, to include the traditional ACH activities such as performing arts and indirect or downstream career skills and knowledge such as sound engineering, publishing and advertising;
 clarify, standardise and, if necessary, develop definitions and meanings of Cultural and Creative Industries terminology; and
 transform the demographic, ownership, management and operational profile of the Cultural and Creative Industries operating at all levels of the ACH value chain of activities.
Failure to address these challenges will render the achievements to date redundant. It is also likely to perpetuate the status quo where the need to develop and preserve ACH, and key role of the Cultural and Creative Industries in facilitating shared socio-economic development and a transformed, democratic country, is undermined and relegated a subordinate status.
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This revised White Paper provides a policy framework that takes into account the ACH road travelled in the past 18 years, the current context and approach of both government and the Cultural and Creative Industries, and the current status quo and challenges experienced by the sector.
5 CONSTITUTIONAL, POLICY AND LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK
The primary legislative mandate of the DAC comes from the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, which states in:
 Section 16(1) – “Everyone has the right to freedom of expression which includes –
(a) freedom of press and other media;
(b) freedom to receive or impact information or ideas;
(c) freedom of artistic creativity ;and
(d) academic freedom and freedom of scientific research”
 Section 30 – “Everyone has the right to use language and to participate in the cultural life of their choice, but no one exercising these rights may do so in a manner inconsistent with any provision of the Bill of Rights”.
Emanating from the 1996 White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage the following Acts have been promulgated by Parliament and institutions created or refocused in furtherance of the constitutional mandate of the Department of Arts and Culture:
 National Heritage Resources Act, 1999 (Act No. 25 of 1999)
 National Heritage Council Act, 1999 (Act No. 11 of 1999)
 Cultural Institutions Act, 1998 (Act No. 119 of 1998)
 South African Geographical Names Council Act, 1998 (Act No. 118 of 1998)
 National Library of South Africa Act, 1998 (Act No. 92 of 1998)
 South African Library for the Blind Act, 1998 (Act No. 91 of 1998)
 National Film and Video Foundation Act, 1997 (Act No. 73 of 1997)
 National Arts Council Act, 1997 (Act No. 56 of 1997)
 Legal Deposit Act, 1997 (Act No. 54 of 1997)
 National Archives and Record Service of South Africa Act, 1996 (Act No. 43 of 1996)
 Pan South African Language Board Act, 1995 (Act No. 59 of 1995)
 Culture Promotion Act, 1983 (Act No. 35 of 1983)
 Culture Promotion Amendment Act of 1998
 Heraldry Act, 1962 (Act No. 18 of 1962)
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6 MORE ACH DEFINITIONS
This revised White Paper steers clear of the semantic and academic differences and distinctions which characterises ACH terminology. However, it does offer some of the definitions of some concepts and terms –offered in various ACH review reports, written feedback provided to the DAC on a draft version of this White Paper, other input such as the Arterial Network’s 2011 document entitled “Adapting the Wheel: Cultural Policies for Africa” – that the DAC has decided to adopt and apply.
Table 1: ACH Definitions CONCEPT / TERM DEFINITION
Advertising
The activity of attracting public attention to a product or business through the medium of announcements in various forms of media, transport, infrastructure, billboards, etc. The production of advertising requires knowledge and skill in the form of film, music, writing, drawing and graphic design.
Architecture
The art and science of designing and erecting buildings. The artistic side is revealed by the form and meaningful originality that a building represents.
Bearer
A person involved in the experience, practice and/or transmission of living heritage, whether as a practitioner, a custodian or in any other role.
Bearer Community
A network of individuals who share a self-inscribed connectedness and identity, anchored in the practice and transmission of a specific form of living heritage over several generations.
Belonging
To be part of and experience a sense of affiliation to, identification and acceptance within a community and larger society. In diverse society like South Africa, it requires identification with and acceptance of groups
Books and Literature
This can take the form of printed or digital books, graphic novels, comic books, physical books, oral and electronic literature. Literature can be fiction or non-fiction.
Born Digital
A range of data and information content that starts its life in digital form.
Community
A network of persons who share a self-ascribed sense of connectedness and identity, anchored in the practice and transmission of living heritage.
Construction Capital
Constructed environment of houses, buildings and other infrastructures such as roads.
Copyright
Key international instruments governing copyright are:
 The Berne Convention – lays down the minimum standards of protection that must be granted to works under copyright in member countries.
 The Agreement of Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights(TRIPS)
 The World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO) internet treaties (The WIPO Copyright Treaty and the WIPO Performances and
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CONCEPT / TERM DEFINITION
Phonograms Treaty)
Crafts
Occupation, trade and artistic practices within the decorative arts. Traditionally defined by their relationship to functional or utilitarian products or by their use of natural media such as wood, clay, glass, textiles and metal. Studio craft, practised by individual artists working alone or in small groups, includes studio pottery, metalwork, weaving, wood-turning and other forms of wood-working, glass-working and glass art.
Cultural Activities, Goods and Services
Activities, goods and services that embody or convey cultural expressions, irrespective of the commercial value they may have. Cultural activities may be an end in themselves, or may contribute to the production of cultural goods and services.
Cultural Capital
The customs, traditions, language and religion of a community and society
Cultural Content
Symbolic meaning, artistic dimension and cultural values that originate or express cultural identities.
Cultural Diplomacy
The exchange of ideas, information, art, lifestyles, value systems, traditions, beliefs and other aspects of culture across nation states, with the intention of developing and sustaining mutual understanding.
Cultural Diversity
The varied ways in which cultural heritage of humanity is expressed, augmented and transmitted through the variety of cultural expressions and diverse modes of artistic creation, production. Dissemination, distribution and enjoyment.
Cultural Expressions
Expressions that result from the creativity of individual, groups and societies and have cultural content.
Cultural Heritage
Monuments, groups of buildings and sites from the past that represent the cultural expressions of ancient communities.
Cultural Mediation
Facilitating relations between local and foreign citizens to develop an understanding and appreciation of, and positive relationships between people of different cultural backgrounds.
Cultural Tourism
Tourism related to a country’s culture, especially the experience of understanding and learning about the lifestyle of people, their history, arts, architecture, religion and other such elements that shape their way of life.
Design
Purposeful or inventive arrangement of parts or details of a work, ornamental pattern, basic scheme or pattern that effects and controls function or development
Development
Creating, providing for, and sustaining the political, socio-economic, human rights and other fundamental freedoms of people.
Digitisation of Heritage
The conversion of analogue information into digital form to capture and manage collective memory of the country.
Environmental Capital
The natural environment and geographic location of a community and society
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CONCEPT / TERM DEFINITION
along with its land, climate and natural resources
Fashion
Most commonly used as a reference to styles of clothing and means the clothing and the study of it. It can also mean the make or form of anything – its style, shape, appearance, structure, pattern or model.
Film and Audio-Visual
Film and tape recordings that present information in audible and pictorial form and involves the senses of sight and sound.
Financial Capital
Financial resources at the disposal of the community and society for investment in development
Heritage Resources
Refers to any place or object of cultural significance, cultural significance means aesthetic, architectural, historical, scientific, social, spiritual, linguistic or technological value or significance.
Heritage Resources Management
Co-ordination of the identification and conservation of heritage resources
Human Capital
The knowledge and skills of community and society needed for economic, technological and scientific development
Immovable Cultural Heritage
Monuments and archaeological sites in a fixed location
Inclusion
To be included on an equal basis in all social and economic activities and rights and to have equal access to all life opportunities
Interculturality
The existence and equitable interaction of diverse cultures and the possibility of generating shared cultural expressions.
Intercommunity Cohesion
Provinces that constitutes districts and provincial or meso-levels of inert-community life
Legacy Project
The commemoration of historic events and leaders marginalised by the previous dispensation.
Legitimacy
Integrity and social legitimacy of public bodies and leaders
Living Heritage/Intangible Cultural Heritage
Cultural expressions and practices that form a body of knowledge and provide for continuity, dynamism and meaning of social life to generations of people as individuals, social groups and communities. It allows for identity and a sense of belonging for people as well as an accumulation on intellectual capital for current and future generations in the context of mutual respect for human, social and cultural rights. Forms of expression include song; dance; story telling; oral history and traditions; legends; spiritual beliefs etc.
Monuments and Memorials
Monuments: works of monumental sculpture and painting, architectural works and inscriptions of outstanding historical, artistic or scientific value.
Memorials: commemorate an individual or group who lost their lives through involvement in conflict or as a result of a courageous act, or made a significant contribution of society.
Moveable Cultural Heritage
Includes paintings, sculptures, coins and manuscripts.
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CONCEPT / TERM DEFINITION
Nation-Building
Nationally oriented and located at macro-social level
Participation
Unhindered, active involvement in ACH, community, social and economic activities, programmes and events
Performing Arts
Forms of creative activity that are performed in front of an audience, including dance, drama, live music, theatre, opera and marching arts such as brass bands.
Political Capital
Access that community members have to public representatives and bodies
Preservation and Protection
Safe-guarding and conserving tangible and intangible/living heritage of people from threat, exploitation and harm while allowing equitable access to all.
Publishing
Production and dissemination of literature or information for public consumption. Includes distribution of printed works, electronic versions of books and periodicals, micropublishing, websites, blogs and video games.
Recording Industry
Specialises in recording and producing song and sound on discs for wider audiences and usually applies to the field of music industry.
Repatriation
Cultural objects returned to an individual or community from outside the Republic of South Africa.
Research
Measures aimed at better understanding ACH, its history, meanings, artistic and aesthetic features, its social, economic and developmental functions, its practice and transmission, and its creation and recreation.
Restitution
The process by which cultural objects are returned to an individual or community within the Republic of South Africa.
Shared Values
Societies with diverse cultures will have diverse and even divergent values. It is thus important for citizens to subscribe to a basic set of shared values such as equality and justice
Sites
Works of people, combined works of nature and of people and archaeological sites of outstanding universal value from a historical, aesthetic, ethnological or anthropological viewpoint.
Social Capital
The bonding capital which ties individuals and communities together and connects groups, organisations and communities
Social Cohesion
A process that assists the building of shared community values and thus is generally community based. Characterised by the presence of strong public institutions capable of mediating social conflict equitably, reducing inequalities in socio-economic conditions, inequalities of opportunities and generally enables people to engage in a common enterprise, face shared challenges and belong to the same community or democracy. Social Cohesion refers to the extent to which a society is coherent, united, functional and providing an environment within which people can flourish.
Software and Computer Services
Primarily used for digitally stored data and application software. Now includes data such as film, tapes and records.
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CONCEPT / TERM DEFINITION
Sustainable Development
The use of resources and the environment in a way that does not restrict their use for future generations.
Tangible Heritage
Includes buildings, historic places, monuments, artefacts, archaeological, architectural, scientific and technological objects of a specific culture that is worthy or preservation and protection for the future.
Television and Broadcasting services
Telecommunications medium for transmitting and receiving moving images, usually accompanied by sound and includes broadcast television, digital broadcasting technology. Includes broadcast television, digital broadcasting technology.
Natural Heritage
Encompasses the countryside and natural environment, including flora and fauna.
Ubuntu
Ubuntu is an ancient African worldview based on the primary values of intense humanness, caring, sharing, respect, compassion and associated values, ensuring a happy and qualitative human community life in the spirit of family. Recognises the significance of each and every human life and promotes an obligation of humans towards the welfare of one another. Emphasises that humanity is not biological, but largely a product of socialisation and active promotion of good social values.
Visual Arts
Includes painting, sculpture, graphic art, photography, drawing, new media arts and installation works.
Victims Of Conflict
Individuals who have perished in conflicts and wars, and those that made a contribution to the human renaissance, in our country, our continent and internationally. Refers to certain persons who died in any area now included in the Republic as a direct result of any war or conflict as specified in the regulations, but excluding victims of conflict covered by commonwealth War Graves Act, 1992 (Act No.8 of 1992), members of the forces of the Great Britain and the former British Empire who died in active service in any area now included in the Republic prior to 4 August 1914, persons who, during Anglo-Boer War (1899-1902), were removed as prisoners of war from any place now included in the persons who died in the “liberation struggle” as defined in the regulations, and in areas included in the Republic as well as outside the Republic.
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PART 2 – PURPOSE, SCOPE AND KEY PRINCIPLES
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7 PURPOSE
This revised White Paper strategically re-positions the DAC to fulfill its mandate; in collaboration with other ACH role-players and within the context and ambit of a developmental state with a view to:
 Ensuring equitable development and growth of ACH, with a particular focus on previously disadvantaged individuals and areas.
 Transforming the approach, institutional structures and processes of ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries to increase demographic representation, participation in, enjoyment of, and equitable access to ACH by all.
 Fostering co-operation, collaboration, integrated planning and implementation between all ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries role-players, including relevant departments in the country’s three spheres of government.
 Consolidating the role of ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries in building social cohesion and a national identity unified in its diversity (drawing on the DAC’s National Strategy for Developing an Inclusive and Cohesive South African Society).
 Maximizing the contribution of the ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries to growing the country’s economy and creating decent work (as detailed in the DAC’s MGE Strategy).
Providing a policy and legislative framework for the development and implementation of initiatives that will:
 Address the complex set of persistent challenges that beset ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries;
 Expand ACH creativities and build the capacity and pool of appropriately skilled ACH practitioners;
 Promote and enhance moral regeneration and general respect for, and adherence to acceptable social norms and values underpinned by the principle of UBUNTU through ACH;
 Build national consciousness and unity through ACH; and
 Facilitate and support South Africa’s Cultural and Creative Industries involvement and competitiveness in the global arena, including across the African continent.
8 SCOPE
This White Paper applies to:
 All public service employees and officials within DAC, Provincial Departments responsible for ACH in their respective provincial governments and local government departments responsible for ACH.
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 All public service employees and officials in complementary line function departments in all three spheres of government.
 All private sector institutions that, through their corporate social investment programmes or other such programmes; support ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries.
 All statutory and non-statutory ACH agencies, councils and other such institutions that implement ACH programmes and projects and generally support the Cultural and Creative Industries.
 All non-governmental local, community, and civil society based ACH organisations that are involved in implementing and supporting ACH programmes in communities and schools.
 All other interested parties, volunteers and stakeholders who participate in the development and implementation of ACH programmes and projects.
 All persons actively or indirectly involved in ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries.
9 KEY PRINCIPLES
The nineteen (19) Key Principles that underpin this White Paper are to:
 Promote Human Rights and equality for all people.
 Advance freedom, rule of law and democracy.
 Encourage and support harmonious cultural expressions and practices, including of foreign nationals in our midst.
 Promote, protect and preserve South Africa’s ACH and especially its indigenous and traditional languages, cultural expressions and cultural practices, without compromising access to all.
 Advance peaceful co-existence, justice and fairness.
 Promote environmental awareness, rights and justice.
 Foster non-racialism; non‐tribalism; non‐sexism; non-discrimination; and anti-xenophobia.
 Advance well-being, inclusivity, social justice and social cohesion.
 Foster nation building, respect for cultural diversity and national consciousness.
 Encourage good citizenship, Ubuntu, honesty and integrity.
 Promote sound family, community and intergroup norms and values.
 Encourage active participatory citizenship, civic responsibility and co-operation.
 Develop streamlined and strengthened implementation institutions; partnerships; programmes and projects that provide holistic and integrated out-comes based services.
 Advance the mainstreaming gender, youth and disability.
 Foster economic justice, material well-being, development of the cultural and creative industries and job creation.
 Advance, redress, develop and foster transformation of approach to ACH, and the Cultural and Creative Industries to represent demographic realities at all levels of the ACH value chain of activities.
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 Increased access to, and participation in, ACH by previously disadvantaged individuals and communities.
 Advance and foster ACH offerings in rural and semi-urban areas.
 Advance South African ACH across the Continent and internationally.
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PART 3 – VISION AND OUTCOMES
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10 VISION
The Vision expressed hereunder emerges from Parts 1, 2 and 3 of this revised White Paper, and is:
11 OUTCOMES
The outcomes of this White Paper are guided by the NGP as well as the NDP which states, in making reference to the country in which we shall live in 2030, that:
“We, the people of South Africa, have journeyed far since the long lines of our first democratic election on 27 April 1994, when we elected a government for us all. We began to tell a new story then. We have lived and renewed that story along the way. Now in 2030 we live in a country which we have remade. We have created a home where everybody feels free yet bounded to others; where everyone embraces their full potential. We are proud to be a community that cares. We have received the mixed legacy of inequalities in opportunity and in where we have lived, but we have agreed to change our narrative of conquest, oppression, resistance. We felt our way towards a new sense of ourselves: Our new story is open ended with temporary destinations, only for new paths to open up once more. It is a story of unfolding learning. Even when we flounder, we remain hopeful. In this story, we always arrive and depart.”
The holistic implementation of this Policy will yield the following five (5) main outcomes:
 ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries developed, promoted and protected.
 Increased number of people and communities experiencing a better life through advancing ACH to all.
 Increased levels of economic growth, job creation and economic justice through contributing to socio-economic development.
 Increased participation of South Africa’s ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries in the global community; and positive relations between South Africa and other countries.
 Transformed ACH institutions and Cultural and Creative Industries that reflect the demographic realities of South Africa at all levels of the ACH Value Chain, and ACH advanced to all.
“South Africa’s rich and diverse Arts, Culture, Heritage and its vibrant Cultural and Creative Industries supported and contributing to socio-economic development”
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PART 4 – ARTS, CULTURE AND HERITAGE: A HUMAN RIGHT, AND THE FOUNDATION OF SOCIO-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
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12 THE RIGHT TO ARTS, CULTURE AND HERITAGE…
“No one may invoke cultural diversity to infringe upon human rights guaranteed by international law, nor limit their scope.”
Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity, UNESCO, 2001
Participating in the Arts, expressing one’s culture and preserving one’s heritage are basic important human rights. ACH as a right emphasizes understanding and tolerance of all cultures based on binding universal ethics and values and mutual respect.
The Universal Declaration of Human Rights recognizes ACH as a right in Article 27, i.e.: “everyone shall have the right to freely participate in the cultural life of the community (and) to enjoy the arts …”
and “everyone has the right to the protection of the moral and material interests resulting from any scientific, literary or artistic production of which he is the author.”
Similarly, the Bill of Rights in the South African Constitution (1996) states:
 Everyone has the right to freedom of expression, which includes … freedom of artistic creativity … (paragraph 16); and
 Everyone has the right to use the language and to participate in the cultural life of their choice … (paragraph 30).
Government, through the DAC, will ensure that ACH as a human right is provided to all by creating the optimum conditions for these rights to be developed, enjoyed and practiced equitably. A prerequisite for a functioning democracy is the principle of freedom of expression. ACH, which is rooted in freedom of expression and creative thought, has a vital role to play in development, social cohesion and nation building and sustaining our emerging democracy.
Humans are holistic beings. They not only need improved material conditions to have a better quality of life. Individuals have psychological, emotional, cultural, spiritual, and intellectual expression, all of which require nurturing and development for them to realise their full potential, and act as responsible and creative citizens. ACH is an avenue through which these human needs can be expressed and met. Additionally, ACH can play a healing role through promoting nation building.
The DAC’s approach to culture is premised on international standards in which culture is understood as an important component of national life which enhances all freedoms. Culture will not be used as a mechanism of exclusion, a barrier between people, nor will cultural practices be reduced to ethnic or religious chauvinism. Cultural diversity will be protected and promoted simultaneous to the free flow of ideas and works. The right of individuals to choose cultural expressions will be upheld. All cultures,
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including the cultures of persons belonging to minorities and of indigenous peoples will be equally recognized and respected. Openness to all cultures will be promoted. Individuals and people will have the fundamental right and equal access to participate in and enjoy all ACH offerings.
13 DEVELOPING AN INCLUSIVE, COHESIVE, CARING AND PROUD SOCIETY…
South Africans are the product of many streams of history and culture, representing the origins, dispersal and re-integration of humanity over hundreds of thousands of years. The need for social transformation is rooted in this history of social and economic divisions (racial, ethnic, cultural) inequality and exploitation – foisted on the vast majority of South Africa’s people.
Apartheid rule fundamentally destroyed South Africa’s social fabric by dividing its people along racial, linguistic and cultural lines; and denying the majority the right to representation in government which effectively denationalised them. It dispossessed this same majority of land; subjected them to inferior levels of education; restricted their free movement and disrupted their family and community life. Ethnicity and tribalism was fostered; the languages and cultures of Black (i.e. African, Indian and Coloured) people were denigrated; and free intercultural social interaction was regulated at best and prohibited at worst.
Political, human, social and economic rights of people in South Africa have been restored since 1994; and much work has been done to bring about social transformation by building social cohesion. Some of these advances are as follows:
 A constitutional democracy, based on the rule of law, subject to the provisions in the Constitution and the separation of powers, has replaced the racially exclusive and non‐accountable parliamentary political dispensations of the past.
 Three spheres of government have been established, for which representation is contested, in an unrestricted multi‐party system.
 As an independent African country made up of diverse people and cultures, South Africa has been hard at work in creating a society in which all its citizens are valued as equal human beings with the same rights regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, religion, language or location.
 The diverse languages, cultures and religions of South African society enjoy constitutional protection and the right to development.
 Equality of persons, across race, gender and culture is a cornerstone of the South African Constitution. In this regard, emphasis has been placed on accelerating the participation of women in political, economic, social, educational and cultural spheres of life. In terms of political participation, the representation of women in Parliament increased from 27.8% in 1994 to 43.3% in 2009. In provincial legislatures it increased from 25.4% to 42.4% over the same period.
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 South Africa has successfully organized and hosted major international economic, cultural and sporting events including the 2010 FIFA World Cup.
Social transformation refers to the efforts to build a society in which all enjoy political and human freedoms, as well as socio-economic rights, within a common value system and national identity. Comprehensive social transformation entails changing the material conditions of all South Africans for the better, whilst forging a nation inspired by values of human solidarity and equality. It also entails being cognisant of the interrelatedness and mutually reinforcing nature of social and economic transformation; and of unity in diversity.
Developing an inclusive, cohesive, caring and proud society is pivotal to social transformation. It requires eradicating all inequalities, exclusions and divisions of the past; and replacing them with a shared South African identity that incorporates diversity in a democratic dispensation, by directly translating the rights and responsibilities of both the state and its citizens into social reality.
Arts, Culture and Heritage are integral to the social life of society and have inherent developmental and social transformative value. The Cultural and Creative Industries by their very nature, and with the leadership of the DAC, are principal role-players in shaping and preserving a common identity, fostering social integration and inclusion in communities and society at large, promoting moral regeneration, and building a nation based on unity and equality.
This White Paper positions the DAC and the Cultural and Creative Industries to fulfil this role by ensuring for example, that cultural practices and customs, which play a crucial role in shaping our identity as a people, increasingly inculcate a feeling of belonging; and with it accountability and responsible behaviour. The DAC and its implementing agencies and councils will serve as the public custodian of the diverse cultures, languages and heritage of the people of South Africa, and as such will provide public support, nationally, for the development of innovation across the full spectrum of the Cultural and Creative Industries as bearers of a dynamic society. This will include the administration of arts, culture and heritage in society in areas such as language, national archives, records, libraries, museums and heraldry.
The DAC will endeavour to base all interventions and programmes on the principles contained in this revised White Paper, and that will add impetus to fostering greater cohesion within diverse communities, national unity between them and a commitment to moral regeneration.
The following diagram depicts the characteristics of a cohesive and unified society as outlined in the DAC’s 2012 !Ke e: /Xarra// Ke: Creating a caring and Proud Society – National Strategy for Developing an Inclusive and a Cohesive South African Society (The National Strategy). It is within this social transformation context and framework and the guidance provided in the National Strategy; that this
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revised White Paper translates into policy intent the role of DAC in facilitating and supporting ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries to actively contribute to building a just, prosperous, inclusive, morally proud and cohesive society at peace with it-self and the world.
Figure 1: Characteristics of a Cohesive and Unified Society
14 GROWING SOUTH AFRICA’S ECONOMY AND CREATING DECENT WORK…
According to the 2011 mid-year population estimates (Stats SA), South Africa’s population stood at more than 50 million. Gauteng accounts for 22.39% of this population figure, followed by KwaZulu-Natal (21.39%) and Eastern Cape (13.50%). The unemployment rate for the fourth quarter of 2012 was 24.9% and the number of discouraged work-seekers increased by 87 000 between Quarters 3 and 4 of 2012. In the fourth quarter of 2012 the figure for other persons that are not economically active increased by
COHESIVE & UNIFIED SOCIETY
Regular interaction, exchange and co-operation & Equal opportunities for development
Shared set of public values and norms & Respect for Laws
Active participation of citizens & Transparent and accountable handling of public affairs
Proud of being South African & Positive Valuation of Diverse Cultures
Respect and Tolerance & Democratic and peaceful resolution of disputes
Sense of Belonging & Shared Vision
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259 000; of which students comprised 41.8%, home-makers (18.9%), and discouraged work seekers (5%) (Stats SA, Quarterly Labour Force Survey, Quarter 4, 2012).
The contribution of the Cultural and Creative Industries to economic growth and creating decent work stems from its social transformation role. As stated by Minister Mashatile in his Keynote Address to the MGE National Consultative Conference held in April 2011; “In this regard, we wish to reiterate that societies with greater social cohesion tend to be the ones that are more economically prosperous. This to us suggests that the pursuit of greater social cohesion is central to the achievement of our goal to build a more equal and prosperous society, underpinned by higher levels of economic growth and job creation”.
THE MGE Conference was held in the wake of a Cabinet decision that included the Cultural and Creative Industries as one of the economic growth and job creation drivers in the country’s New Growth Path goal of creating 5 million jobs over 10 years. This decision is given effect in the IPAP2 with focused and significant state supported interventions for the cultural industries, in particular the craft and music sub-sectors, jewellery production, clothing, leather, footwear and textiles.
The patent political support for, and recognition of, the contribution of the Cultural and Creative Industries to the national effort to grow the economy and create decent works provides the foundation for the policy statements reflected in the White Paper.
One of the broader objectives of a developmental state is to restructure and grow the economy to create decent work; reduce current disparities with respect to income distribution levels and broaden the demographic base of the general economy. Formalising an economic transformative role for the Cultural and Creative Industries incorporates advancing the socio-economic and political transformation agenda of the developmental state, promoting social cohesion and nation building, creating decent jobs and facilitating skills development, in addition to responding to other socio-economic needs.
The varied and wide range of South Africa’s ACH will be developed and increasingly leveraged to contribute to creating social cohesion and decent work, growing the economy and building our nation, in alignment with the country’s NGP, NDP and DAC’s MGE Strategy. This will not only include the traditionally economically viable opportunities for growth but also the exploration of short and medium term jobs that can be created through for example ‘working for arts’ programmes and festivals. Targets for permanent, short and medium term work opportunities will be set every five years by the DAC, in consultation with stakeholders in the Cultural and Creative Industries; other relevant Departments of Tourism, Economic Development, Trade and Industry as well as private Cultural and Creative Industries organisations such as Brand South Africa and Proudly South African.
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Deepening, better resourcing and implementing the MGE Strategy is central to unlocking the economic transformative role of the Cultural and Creative Industries, as it has the potential to increase local content generation, job creation and export potential of arts, culture and heritage.
The preservation, promotion and natural progression of ACH should no longer be seen merely as showing where we come from and how we express ourselves. Active steps will be taken to explore and identify the economic value and opportunity inherent in the Cultural and Creative Industries.
South Africa currently does not have reliable time series, qualitative and quantitative or baseline data that clearly depicts the economic contribution of the ACH and that can be used for future planning. As stated in the DAC’s MGE Strategy the data and information regarding the economic contribution and performance of the Cultural and Creative Industries that does exist are found across three major divisions in the national accounts. However, some data gained from various research reports; conducted by a few organisations and government departments; validates the noteworthy contribution of the Cultural and Creative Industries to the economy and employment figures. Information contained in the MGE Strategy shows on the economic and employment contribution of the Cultural and Creative Industries.
A 1998 Report to the then Department of Arts, Culture, Science and Technology entitled “Cultural Industries Growth Strategy (CIGS) The South African Music Industry” describes the music industry as a “key provider of jobs and income revenue in the South African economy” and states that the industry, employed approximately 12 000 people and registered gross turnover of about R900m, at the time the report was written. The Report further states that the entire industry was estimated as being worth R2billion and that in the period 1992 to 1996 the South African music market expanded by 60% making it the 15th fastest growing music market in the world. By 2007, these figures had increased significantly. As stated in the MGE Strategy, in 2007, the music industry employed 18 800 people in Gauteng alone, was worth R17 billion and had been ranked 17th in the world.
In 2008/9 the direct income of heritage sites amounted to R176 million; and in 2006 revenue from broadcasting advertising stood at R8.5 billion, and from film R5.5 billion. In 2008, the turnover of Gauteng’s Cultural and Creative Industries was estimated at R192.5 million. According to the Department of Trade and Industry website, the craft sector contributed an estimated R1.1 billion to GDP and employed more than 38 000 people. An HSRC Assessment Report of 2010 states that Visual Arts and Crafts employed about 17 700 people and generated turnover of nearly R2 billion and gross value add of R1 billion per annum. The Cradle of Humankind’s 2009 “10th Anniversary Management Authority Supply, Demand and Investment Research” reflected that the number of attractions in the area grew from 63 to 405 in the 10 years and that 7000 permanent jobs and 2 200 casual jobs were created.
The DAC’s 2009 Events and Technical Services Task Team Report states that South Africa’s Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Exhibitions (MICE) industry is worth more than R19 billion, contributes
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about R20 billion to GDP and pays approximately R6 billion in salaries per annum. The country’s Technical Production Services Association’s (TPSA) 2003 Survey estimated that the annual turnover of TPSA members only was about R1.8 billion while further surveys conducted in 2004 revealed a turnover of R4.5 billion.
It is clear from the above that the Cultural and Creative Industries can and will create direct and in-direct short, medium and long term jobs; as well as contribute to the economy; through:
 The construction, renovation and refurbishment of ACH infrastructure;
 ACH tourism.
 Applying the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) methodology, where possible, in the refurbishment, renovating, maintenance and construction of ACH infrastructure, especially in local communities;
 Contracting services of BB BEE and SMME private Cultural and Creative Industries partners;
 Facilitating partnerships between business, especially established and new/start-ups/ SMME businesses;
 ACH related support services e.g. sound technicians; stage managers etc. and
 Promoting and supporting local manufacture and procurement of arts and crafts.
A uniform approach to describing and gathering information and conducting evidence based research will be determined to facilitate evaluation of the contribution of ACH to economic growth, job creation and decreasing inequality.
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PART 5 – STRATEGIC APPROACH TO ADVANCING ACH AND THE CULTURAL AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES
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15 OVER-ARCHING APPROACH
The DAC’s strategic approach to advancing ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries encompasses the Purpose, Vision and Key Principles of this revised White Paper. It is also informed by the Part 2 which re-iterates the important position of ACH in South Africa – as a human right and the foundation of socio-economic development. The approach is specifically designed to achieve the five (5) outcomes listed in Part 4 of this revised White Paper.
Implementation of this approach is premised on the DAC and government in general continuing to work collaboratively, and in partnership, with all ACH institutions and Cultural and Creative Industries role-players within the context and definition of developmental government in this revised White Paper.
It is also grounded in ACH Institutions and the Cultural and Creative Industries understanding and embracing the role of a developmental government as supportive and facilitative rather than prescriptive, regulatory or controlling.
The main assumption of the approach is that ACH Institutions and the Cultural and Creative Industries will be responsive to, and maximize the opportunities created by an enabling environment that encourages and supports innovation, creativity, the development of ACH and the socio-economic benefits that can be reaped therefrom.
The capacities and abilities of the Cultural and Creative Industries will be harnessed and sustained by an enabling policy, legislative and regulatory environment, including appropriate and adequate financial resourcing of programmes and projects.
The three (3) philosophies that underpin the DAC’s strategic approach are: Creating a Better Life for All through Socio-Economic Development; Offering an Integrated and Holistic package of Services and Mainstreaming of Transversal Matters.
15.1 Creating a Better Life For All Through Socio-Economic Development
This revised White Paper confirms that the DAC and all ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries role-players can and should play in creating a better life for all by transforming South African society through shared socio-economic growth and development; building social cohesion and national unity; fostering moral regeneration and national consciousness; and enhancing nation-building.
The NDP states, in Chapter 15, that:
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“In 2030, South Africans will be more conscious of the things they have in common than their differences. Their lived experiences will progressively undermine and cut across the divisions of race, gender, space and class. The nation will be more accepting of peoples’ multiple identities. In this South Africa, there will be:
 Broad-based knowledge about and support for a set of values shared by all South Africans, including the values contained in the Constitution.
 An inclusive society and economy. This means tackling the factors that sustain inequality of opportunity and outcomes by building capabilities and redressing the wrongs of the past.
 Increased interaction between South Africans from different social and racial groups.
 Strong leadership across society and a mobilized, active and responsible citizenry.”
In this vein, the DAC will support ACH, its institutions and the Cultural and Creative Industries to increasingly play a constructive and progressive role in building on our shared heritage, whilst opening up the narrative and spaces to express ourselves in terms of who we are. This role is fully cognisant of, and supports, the key socio-economic development and nation building objectives which are central on the path towards 2030.
ACH institutions and the Cultural and Creative Industries will not only journey along and be fellow travelers on the path to 2030 – it will endeavor to positively influence, guide, develop and explore the route along the way, with a view to arriving in 2030 knowing who we are and comfortably expressing ourselves based on where we come from within the paradigm of unity in diversity.
The DAC and its provincial and local government equivalents, working in partnership with all ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries role-players, will implement this White Paper en route to 2030, to ensure that ACH in the country is more visible and has shifted from its “nice to have” to a “must have” status because of the critical benefits that can be gained towards creating a better life for all by building a society and country that positively impacts on and responds to the multiple social and economic needs of people’s lives. These benefits range from mutual respect amongst individuals; eradicating all forms of crime, corruption and violence; providing previously disadvantaged individuals with opportunities to achieve human dignity as well as social and economic well-being; and promoting peace, friendship, tolerance and national unity among cultural, religious and linguistic communities.
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15.2 Providing Integrated and Holistic Support to ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries
An integrated and holistic approach, that is cognizant of all elements of activities (Cycle of Activities) that the Cultural and Creative Industries engages in, will be applied. These sequential activities are creation – production – dissemination – exhibition/reception/transmission – consumption/participation.
The following diagram explains the key features of each activity in the cycle.
Support services will be provided through collaborative inter-and intra- departmental, inter-governmental partnerships, formal partnerships with the Cultural and Creative Industries role-players, and partnerships with any other properly constituted entity that supports and is involved in ACH and the Creative and Cultural Industries.
CREATION
developing ideas and content; once-off productions
PRODUCTION
reproducible forms and specialist tools, infrastructure and processes
DISSEMINATION
wholesale, retail and rental of mass-produced ACH products
TRANSMISSION
place of consumption, provision of live /unmediated ACH experiences, etc
CONSUMPTION
audiences and participants consuming ACH products and taking part in ACH experiences and activities
Figure 2: Cultural and Creative Industries Cycle of Activities
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All programmes and projects will be designed to simultaneously develop ACH as well as pursue and integrate the dual relevance and posture of ACH as drivers of job creation, economic growth, social cohesion, moral regeneration and building a positive sense of national identity and consciousness.
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15.3 Mainstreaming Transversal Matters
DAC, its provincial and local government equivalents and all role-players of the Cultural and Creative Industries will mainstream issues of Gender, Youth, People with Disabilities, Environment, HIV and AIDS and Co-operative Governance in all its policies, projects and activities; in accordance with national policy and legislative frameworks as well as international conventions, on these issues, that South Africa subscribes to. Mainstreaming activities and mechanisms will include:
 Setting and achieving employment equity targets within all Cultural and Creative Industries institutions and structures.
 Setting and achieving preferential procurement targets for women, youth and people with disabilities within all Cultural and Creative Industries institutions and structures; and for all ACH investments e.g. for building and maintaining ACH infrastructure.
 Ensuring that all ACH activities comply with and respect South Africa’s and International environmental sustainability policies and requirements.
 Ensuring that all Cultural and Creative Industries structures and the services it offers allow for barrier-free access, and accommodates various disabilities.
 Developing and implementing HIV and AIDS workplace programmes and other support services such as voluntary counseling, education on prevention of infections, etc.
 Mapping career paths and implementing learnerships and Internship programmes within the Cultural and Creative Industries and promoting learnerships for young people, women and people with disabilities.
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PART 6 – STRATEGIC LEVERS FOR ADVANCING ACH AND THE CULTURAL AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES
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16 STRATEGIC LEVERS ARE…
The Strategic Levers, informed by Parts 1 to 5, are essentially the mechanisms that will drive implementation of this revised White Paper. Ideally, all ACH programmes and projects of government and non-government role-players involved in and with ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries will be will be conceptualized, planned and implemented within the framework of one or more of these Strategic Levers.
Each Strategic Lever has specific Objective/s and will directly or indirectly contribute to the one or more of the outcomes listed in Part 4 above. Key activities will be implemented to realize each Lever in short, medium and long term phases. These activities are detailed in the National ACH Implementation Plan attached to this revised White Paper as Annexure A.
All the Levers fall within the ambit of DAC’s mandate, role and responsibilities. The key element of integrating social and economic aspects of ACH and the three (3) philosophies of Creating a Better Life for All; Offering an Integrated and Holistic package of Services and Mainstreaming of Transversal Matters will form part of each Lever and its key activities, as may be applicable.
The emphasis of all existing and new programmes and projects will be to optimize the role and unlock the contribution of ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries to building social cohesion, national unity, creating decent work and growing the country’s economy – simultaneous to sustaining and expanding the sector.
An incremental increase in the number of suitably qualified ACH practitioners, implementation of ACH studies at all schools and from early childhood to secondary levels, the number of community level ACH centres, increased numbers of people participating in ACH activities are some of the measures that will be utilized to evaluate the extent to which ACH is being advanced.
Some of the measures to evaluate economic growth and job creation outcomes will be the number of short, medium and long term jobs created in general; the number of jobs created for previously disadvantaged people; the number of jobs created for youth, women and persons with disabilities; the number of SMME and BB BEE companies contracted or sub-contracted to perform outsourced functions; and the percentage of procurement spend and tenders awarded to SMME’s and BB BEE companies.
A reduction in reports of exclusion; higher figures of inclusion and cohesion; visible integration of social cohesion and nation building in socio-economic development programmes of all three spheres of government and higher levels of active citizenship are some of the indicators that will be utilized to evaluate the extent to which social cohesion and national unity has been built through ACH.
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The Strategic Levers are shown in the following diagram.
Figure 3: Strategic Levers
“South Africa’s rich and diverse Arts, Culture, Heritage and its vibrant Cultural and Creative Industries supported and contributing to socio-economic development”
.
1. An Enabling Policy, Legislative and Regulatory Environment
2. Transformation of ACH and the Cultural
and Creative Industries
3. Infrastructure Development and Maintenance
4. Governance and Implementation
Institutions
5. Cultural and Creative Industries
Fund (CCIF)
6. Cultural Diplomacy
7. Skills Development and Education
8. ACH Sector Strategies and Plans
9. Sustaining ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries
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16.1 An Enabling Policy, Legislative and Regulatory Environment
This revised White Paper will serve as the overarching policy for ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries. Additional policies, if at all necessary, will derive from this revised White Paper but DAC will be cautious about developing additional policies that may duplicate and/or nullify this Policy. Instead DAC will, in partnership with ACH role-players, develop detailed sector specific strategies (see below).
All existing national ACH legislation will be reviewed to repeal and/or revise and amend Acts and sections of Acts that are rendered obsolete by this revised White Paper. Amendments will include addressing areas of duplication and overlaps in the mandates of institutions, such as SAHRA and NHC both having the mandate on the repatriation of heritage objects. Legislation will also be amended to reflect current realities such as the location of the SAGNC secretariat being within the department and not the NHC. New legislation will be developed to address identified gaps.
The DAC will collaborate with and support its provincial and local government counterparts, to ensure that they review, and if necessary revise their policies, legislation and regulations on ACH in alignment with this revised White Paper and the sector strategies that will be developed. The DAC will also initiate a review, in collaboration with other departments, of their policies and legislation that directly impact on ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries but fall outside the mandate of the DAC, for example South Africa’s foreign, trade and investment policies.
Table 2 below reflects the Objective, Outcome/s and some of the outputs of this Strategic Lever. The activities are detailed in the National Implementation Plan which accompanies this revised White Paper.
Table 2: Objective, Outcomes and Outputs – Enabling Policy, Legislative and Regulatory Environment Strategic Lever AN ENABLING POLICY, LEGISLATIVE AND REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT OBJECTIVE To facilitate implementation and actualisation of the policy intent of this revised White Paper by translating it into legislation and regulations OUTCOME/S  ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries developed, promoted and protected.  Increased number of people and communities experiencing a better life through advancing ACH to all.  Increased levels of economic growth, job creation and economic justice through contributing to socio-economic development.  Increased participation of South Africa’s ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries in the global community and positive relations between South Africa and other countries.  Transformed ACH institutions and Cultural and Creative Industries that reflect the demographic realities of South Africa, at all levels of the ACH Value Chain.
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SOME OUTPUTS (See National Implementation Plan)
 Repealed and/or amended Legislation and Regulations i.r.o. copy right, intellectual property, tax rebates, etc.
 New Legislation and Regulations developed and adopted.
16.2 Transformation of ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries
Transforming the Cultural and Creative Industries and increasing access to, participation in and enjoyment of ACH to all, is inextricably linked to government’s transformation of South African society as a whole. The general transformation agenda of government addresses past racial and class (economic) imbalances resultant from apartheid and aims to build an equitable, fair and inclusive society.
Despite the advances since 1994, the vast majority of South Africa’s previously disadvantaged individuals and communities still do not have equitable access to participate in and enjoy ACH offerings; and the Cultural and Creative Industries has yet to reflect the transformed society envisaged of a democratic South Africa. The legacy of apartheid that restricted the majority of South Africans from meaningful participation in the mainstream economy is mirrored in the key economic activities that the Cultural and Creative Industries engages in.
During the past nineteen years of democratic governance, ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries role-players outside of government were primarily responsible for transforming the sector while government focused on creating an enabling environment for ACH. The insufficient and slow pace of transformation to date necessitates government playing a more proactive and leading role in transforming the Creative and Cultural Industries, and the approach to providing ACH to all.
The DAC’s Heritage Human Resources Development Strategy states “Racial demographics measured progress towards employment equity and social transformation in the sector, with the survey showing a persistent predominance of whites in the sector population at 49% and even higher ratios of white males and females in senior management, middle management and supervisory levels of the occupational spectrum when compared to African, Coloureds or Indians. This is a matter of historical inertia dictated by political policies before 1994 and statistical data is available from various official sources as the primary social transformation indicator”.
DAC’s philosophy of transformation is that it is multi-faceted; structural, cuts across all ACH programmes and projects and all Cultural and Creative Industries role-players and must be rooted in policy and governance. This represents a significant paradigm shift from viewing transformation as a simple matter of racial quotas and targets.
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Transforming the economic face and demographic representation of the Cultural and Creative Industries will largely be guided by the Broad Based Black Economic Empowerment (BB BEE) Act of 2003 which focuses on broadening ownership and control of capital accumulation through de-racialising ownership and the top echelons of business institutions. This will be achieved through redistribution and ensuring that new growth favours previously disadvantaged entrepreneurs. These efforts will mainly target the Production, Dissemination and Transmission activities of the ACH Value Chain.
Transforming the provision of ACH to ensure increased access to, enjoyment of, and participation in ACH by previously disadvantaged individuals will focus on the Creation and Consumption activities of the ACH Value Chain. Attention will be paid to broadening the participation base through interventions that, for example, target previously disadvantaged individuals in rural and urban communities, are located and offered at local community level, is accessible to and inclusive of people with disabilities and build forms of indigenous ACH expression.
Table 3 below reflects the Objective, Outcome/s and Outputs of this Strategic Lever. The key activities are detailed in the National Implementation Plan which accompanies this revised White Paper.
Table 3: Objective, Outcome/s and Outputs-Transformation of ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries Strategic Lever TRANSFORMATION OF ACH AND THE CULTURAL AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES OBJECTIVE To ensure:  the Cultural and Creative Industries reflects the demographic realities of South Africa, at all levels and across the ACH value chain of activities; and  there is increased participation in, enjoyment of and access to ACH. OUTCOME/S Transformed ACH institutions and Cultural and Creative Industries that reflect the demographic realities of South Africa at all levels of the ACH Value Chain, and ACH advanced to all. SOME OUTPUTS (See National Implementation Plan)
 Transformation Audit Report
 Transformation Charter
 Transformation Indicators and Targets
 “More than you can imagine” cultural experiences with a national calendar of events
 Information Precincts
 Heritage Legacy Projects
 Community Based Heritage Initiatives
 Public Art Programme
 Library and multi-functional Community Arts Centre established in every ward
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16.3 Infrastructure Development and Maintenance
The DAC’s approach to infrastructure development includes conducting a conditions-based and utilization assessment of existing infrastructure and an audit of needs at local government level.
A “whole life cycle” method to infrastructure budgeting and development, i.e. conceptualisation, planning, construction and maintenance as a single cycle; and the application of construction norms and standards based on the concepts of universal design and barrier free access will be applied when refurbishing, renovating or building new infrastructure. The concept of universal design allows for mainstreaming the participation of persons with disabilities. Wherever possible and feasible, new ACH infrastructure will attempt to meet multiple needs of the sector. The DAC will strive to ensure that infrastructure budgets provide for construction and long term maintenance and will encourage private sector partners that build ACH infrastructure in townships to include a three (3) year maintenance plan that they will finance as part of their handover of the structure to communities.
The DAC will also partner with the Department of Public Work’s EPWP, relevant local government structures and the targeted beneficiaries to construct and maintain all ACH infrastructure. The DAC will also ensure there is skills transfer during the construction process and that the construction creates short to medium-term jobs while the maintenance process and plan creates longer-term sustainable jobs since maintenance is an ongoing function. Local communities will be capacitated and supported to perform facilities management functions. The DAC will also strive to increase access to the use of the existing physical infrastructure, multi-functional centres and production houses as an alternative to building new infrastructure.
The following table (Table 4) reflects the Objective, Outcome/s and Outputs of this Strategic Lever. The key activities are detailed in the National Implementation Plan which accompanies this revised White Paper
Table 4: Objective, Outcome/s and Outputs-Infrastructure Development and Maintenance Strategic Lever INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND MAINTENANCE OBJECTIVE To ensure the development and maintenance of ACH infrastructure that can support local, regional, national and international ACH offerings as well as increase participation in, and access to ACH. OUTCOME/S
 ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries developed, promoted and protected.
 Increased number of people and communities experiencing a better life through advancing ACH to all.
 Increased levels of economic growth, job creation and economic justice through contributing to socio-economic development.
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 Increased participation of South Africa’s ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries in the global community and positive relations between South Africa and other countries. SOME OUTPUTS (See National Implementation Plan)
 Infrastructure Audit Report
 Infrastructure Development and Maintenance Plan
 Current infrastructure maintained /refurbished / renovated
 New infrastructure built
16.4 Governance and Implementation Institutions
a. Governance
All structures of all three spheres of government will be bound to the principles of co-operative governance and inter-governmental relations outlined in Chapter 3, Section 41 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa (Act 108 of 1996) and the Intergovernmental Relations Framework Act (No 13 of 2005).
The main permanent national level structures will be a Minister and MECs Committee (MinMEC) and a Technical Implementation Committee (TIC). The provincial and local spheres of government will establish similar committees comprising of political appointments (MEC and relevant Members of Mayoral Committees – MMCs) and of senior staff from the administration.
All institutional arrangements for ACH, at both government and non-government levels, must reflect principles and practices of:
 good governance and transparency;
 co-operation and collaboration while respecting autonomy;
 inclusivity in terms of race, gender, disability, age, religion, language, etc.;
 clear and distinct roles and responsibilities;
 offering holistic and integrated services;
 non-partisanship; and
 streamlining, efficiency and effectiveness.
b. Implementation Institutions
The 1996 White Paper provided for the establishment of national and provincial public entities, each with their own governing board and advisory councils. For example there is the National Arts Council (NAC), Provincial Art Councils, Foundation for the Creative Arts, Heraldry Council, Performing Arts
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Councils, Provincial Heritage Resource Agencies (PHRAs), National Monument Council (NMC), National Heritage Council (NHC), etc.
The current set of public entities linked to and funded by the DAC are number no less than 28. Despite acknowledged achievements and strengths of some of these entities, some are seemingly limited in their ability to meet the moral, social and economic demands of the new and future South Africa. The DAC’s position on its public entities is that they must act as key drivers of this revised White Paper. As such their mandate must unambiguously be to advance South Africa’s rich and diverse ACH and position the Cultural and Creative Industries at the core of socio-economic development. This means that the transformation imperatives such as increasing participation in and access to ACH, and maximizing the social, economic, moral regeneration and national consciousness must be placed upfront.
Additionally, the DAC’s MGE Strategy states “There is evidence of overlapping mandates and duplication of effort between DAC and its institutions” and “the almost unanimous submission of all role players is that there is a need for rationalization of institutions and clarification is needed on the roles and responsibilities to avert parallel and overlapping initiatives and unnecessary government consumption expenditure”. The need for rationalization was already mentioned in the DAC’s 2007 Review of Heritage Legislation Report which states “…it has been noted that a certain degree of overlap exists between the roles and responsibilities of DAC and its associated institutions and agencies. For example, the White Paper, following the lead of the Arts and Culture Task group (ACTAG), implies that the role of policy formulation lies with statutory bodies tasked with advising the Minister on such matters, and that the role of DAC, as the Minister’s executive arm, is to implement such policies. The White Paper tasks the NHC with responsibility for liaising with the Works Heritage Committee regarding World Heritage sites, whereas the function is currently performed by the Department of Environmental Affairs (DEAT) and to some extent DAC. SAHRA and the NHC are tasked with responsibilities for repatriation”.
This revised White Paper thus proposes a rationalisation of its public entities that will address the misnomers mentioned above, prevent wasteful expenditure and alleviate poor communication and co-ordination and optimise implementation performance and efficiencies as well as effective use of resources.
In developing the rationalized institutions, the DAC has adopted the South African adapted categorization of the UNCTAD classification and UNESCO Framework for Cultural Statistics as contained in the MGE Strategy and made further adaptations to incorporate issues and sectors that are critical and specific to the South African context. Applying the United Nations classification system has the added advantage of fully integrating the DAC and its institutions into the international Cultural and Creative Industries, and facilitating South Africa benchmarking itself, and comparing its performance to global standards. The UNCTAD classification and UNESCO Framework collectively provide definitional clarity, aligns and categorizes the Cultural and Creative Industries into six (6) main sectors. These main sectors are Cultural and Natural Heritage; Performance and Celebration; Visual Arts and Crafts; Press, Books and
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Information; Audio-Visual and Interactive Media; and Design and Creative Services. This categorization is intended to guide decision-making and work organisation; inform future research; and form the basis of ongoing monitoring and evaluation of the socio-economic impact of the Cultural and Creative Industries.
The following table (5) reflects the adapted classification and categorization of the main and sub-sectors of the Cultural and Creative Industries in South Africa. In offering this classification and categorization, the DAC acknowledges and notes that ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries is on a positive growth path that renders it an ever evolving sector, with new main and sub-sectors emerging on a regular basis. To accommodate this context, the DAC will in the short and medium term retain the adapted categorisation of the 6 main sectors and provide for additional sub-sectors that may not be listed in the Table below. Any changes to the 6 main sectors will be effected when the implementation of this White Paper is evaluated and the report thereof indicates the need for change.
Table 5: South African categorization of Cultural and Creative Industries Cultural and Natural Heritage Performance and Celebration Visual Arts and Crafts Language and Publishing Audio-Visual and Interactive Media Design, Creative and ACH Technical Support Services
 Museums (including virtual museums)
 Heritage Resource Management
 Performing Arts
 Theatre
 Music
 Opera
 Dance
 Festivals, rituals and events
 Days of commemoration
 Orchestra
 Story-telling
 Fine Arts
 Photography
 Crafts
 Books
 Newspapers and magazines
 Other printed and electronic material
 Library (including virtual libraries)
 Book fairs and book clubs
 Archives
 Heraldry
 Languages
 Film and video
 TV and Radio (including Internet live streaming)
 Internet podcasting
 Video Games (including online)
 Fashion Design
 Graphic Design
 Interior Design
 Furniture Design
 Landscape Design
 Architectural Services
 Advertising Services
 ACH Technical Support Services e.g. lighting, sound, stage.
Based on the afore-mentioned context, the DAC will rationalize its entities and establish one national institution per defined Cultural and Creative Industries sector. The governance arrangements of all the institutions will ensure responsibility and accountability for their specific mandates, responsibilities and performance. Where possible and necessary, advisory boards as opposed expansive governance arrangements related to executive boards, will be established. Each national institution will establish sub-committees such as a skills development sub-committee, as is required, to perform its tasks.
The following Diagram (see below) represents the streamlined national institutions that will be directly accountable to the DAC and responsible for implementing this revised White Paper. The diagram
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includes the Cultural and Creative Industries Fund (CCIF) which is Strategic Lever 5 of this revised white Paper.
Figure 4: DAC’s National Implementing Institutions and the CCIF
Each National Institution will bring together representatives from DAC, all the main and sub-sectors of ACH organisations and the Cultural and Creative Industries that fall under the institution, provincial and local level equivalents, non-government and private sector ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries organisations involved in and with ACH, and any other role-player involved in the main or sub-sectors of ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries. All government representatives will have ex-officio status on the Agency/Council’s Executive Committee. The structure of each Institution (see the following Diagram) will comprise of an elected and/or appointed Executive Committee; a Secretariat; and Sub-Committees. An Executive Committee member, appointed by the committee to play this role, will chair each sub-committee. Other members of each sub-committee will comprise of role-players specific to the core function of the Sub-Committee.
Notwithstanding the above, the DAC recognizes that re-aligning its public 28 plus public entities into six (6) national institutions (one institution per Cultural and Creative Industries sector) will require a full scale evaluation of all existing entities at all spheres of government to ensure that critical functions are incorporated into the revised institutions and that overlaps, duplications and gaps are addressed. The evaluation will also explore the form that provincial and local level institutions should take to implement and perform the tasks set out by the national institutions and the DAC. The National ACH
DAC
Cultural and Natural Heritage Council
Performance and Celebration Council
Cultural and Creative Industries Fund
Visual Arts and Crafts Council
Language and Publishing Council
Audio-Visual and Interactive Media Council
Design and Creative Services Council
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Implementation Plan details the activities that will be implemented to realize the revised national institutions.
Table 6 below reflects the Objective, Outcome/s and Outputs of this Strategic Lever. The key activities are detailed in the National Implementation Plan which accompanies this revised White Paper.
Table 6: Objective, Outcomes and Outputs-Governance and Implementation Institutions Strategic Lever GOVERNANCE AND IMPLEMENTATION INSTITUTIONS OBJECTIVE To ensure that the DAC’s governance and institutional arrangements:  Enables integrated and holistic implementation of this revised White Paper;  Is streamlined to reflect prudent use of limited resources; and  Reflects good and effective governance. OUTCOME/S ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries developed, promoted and protected.
Cultural and Natural Heritage Institution
Secretariat
Executive Committee
Skills Development
Sub-Committee
Transformation
Sub-Committee
Research & Development Sub-Committee
XXXX
Sub-Committee
XXX
Sub-Committee
Figure 5: Example of the structure of a National Institution
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SOME OUTPUTS (See National Implementation Plan)
 Structure Review Report
 Revised Structures established and functional
16.5 Cultural and Creative Industries Fund (CCIF)
DAC’s funding for ACH is currently disbursed through three (3) entities, one of which is the National Arts Council (NAC).
The NAC was established as a statutory body, in terms of the 1996 White Paper, with the principal task of distributing funds to artists, cultural institutions, non-governmental organisations and community based organisations. Implementing agencies, councils and other Cultural and Creative Industries organisations are expected to apply to the NAC for programme grants. The NAC also offers individual bursaries albeit only to post graduate students. Undergraduates are offered bursaries through education and training institutions. Funding preference is given to first-time applications. Therefore recipients cannot rely on NAC funding year after year. Furthermore the NAC is unlikely to fund an entire project, i.e. it does not provide funding for running costs of organisations, seed funding, music instruments, infrastructure, capital costs and purchasing of equipment.
The example of NAC points to the inadequacy of the current funding arrangements for ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries. Role-players involved in and with ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries have consistently and regularly raised challenges they experience with accessing the available funding. The reasons for this vary from a lack of awareness of where and how to raise funds, to the limited amount of financial resources and funding application processes that are cumbersome, complicated and lengthy.
Furthermore, the DAC maintains that the disbursement of funding directly impacts on, amongst others, the:
 Pace of transformation, especially the elements of increasing participation in and access to ACH by previously disadvantaged individuals and communities.
 Development of artists and practitioners from marginalized sectors of society.
 Extent to which the contribution of ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries to socio-economic development is maximized.
 Extent to which the creativity, innovation and ACH expressions of individual artists and groups are supported, developed and promoted.
To address the afore-mentioned context and in accordance with international best practice and to facilitate securing financial resources for the ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries from other
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sectors of society, donor agencies, etc. the DAC will establish a Cultural and Creative Industries Fund (CCIF). Formation of the CCIF will streamline funding of the Cultural and Creative Industries and ACH matters by eliminating duplicate funding, so-called “double dipping” by beneficiaries and ensuring that agreed criteria for funding are adhered to and applied fairly, equitably and independently.
The purpose of the CCIF will be to raise and disburse funds for advancing South Africa’s rich and diverse ACH to all and positioning the Cultural and Creative Industries at the core of socio-economic development; and the general implementation of this revised White Paper. Sources of funding for the CIF may include DAC’s annual budget allocation; any additional budget provided by National Government; social responsibility budgets of private sector partners; contributions from local, provincial, national, continental and international Cultural and Creative Industries organisations; funds from donor agencies; an agreed on percentage of funding / takings generated from the hosting of international ACH events; an agreed minimum annual contribution from businesses that constitute the Cultural and Creative Industries; contributions from international private sector companies that invest in, and do business in the country; any other person and/or organisation willing to contribute to the CCIF; funds generated from specific fund-raising activities and projects implemented by the CCIF and the allocation for ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries from the Lotteries and the Job Fund.
The CCIF will ensure that the beneficiaries of any funding it awards comply with, and meet the criteria listed below, which will be used to assess all applications, approve and make recommendations on which applicants should receive funding. A short list of applicants who comply with most, if not all, of the criteria will be presented to the Minister and Deputy Minister of the DAC for final endorsement and approval.
Some of the criteria that will determine favourable consideration of applications are programmes and projects that:
 Are aligned to the Vision, Principles, Outcomes and Strategic Levers of this revised White Paper.
 Increase the numbers of people that participate in, and have access to ACH offerings.
 Mainstream and facilitate meaningful inclusion of marginalized groups such as women, youth and persons with disabilities.
 Are directed at the provision and/or the maintenance of ACH infrastructure.
 Target previously disadvantaged communities or involving previously disadvantaged and marginalised groups.
 Foster unity, pride, tolerance and understanding.
 Seek to redress past imbalances and lack of opportunities.
 Contribute to economic growth and the creation of decent work.
 Contribute to building social cohesion, sustainable and empowered (for e.g. using theatre to educate communities about health issues) communities, and national unity.
 Focus on skills development of ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries practitioners, and expanding the pool of skilled human resource capacity of the sector.
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 Support Arts education in schools.
 Promote the development of all languages and indigenous ACH expressions and practices.
The CCIF will establish and implement transparent and accountable processes for tasks such as the adjudication of applications received. Proper monitoring and evaluation mechanisms will also be established to regularly assess appropriateness of processes; achievement of outcomes; and as a form of accounting to the public at large on use of funds managed by CCIF. The outcomes of this revised White Paper will serve as the objectives of the CCIF. No single organisation shall receive more than 15% of available funds in one year and funding will be disbursed on the basis of a formula that will be developed specifically for this purpose. All CCIF recipients will be required to submit project implementation and financial reports to verify income and expenditure; spending patterns in the arts and culture sector as well as the status of the project that received funding.
As in the case with its revised national institutions, the DAC recognizes that it will have to undertake further detailed research, including best practice research, into the establishment, role and responsibilities, and functioning of the CCIF. The research will include assessing and incorporating the funding responsibilities currently residing with the DAC’s 3 agencies. The National Implementation Plan “Laying the Foundation for Greatness by…Advancing South Africa’s rich and diverse ACH; and Positioning the Cultural and Creative Industries at the core of socio-economic development”, details the activities that will be implemented to establish the CCIF. The activities include developing detailed Terms of Reference, clarifying the mandate, responsibilities and functioning, finalising funding criteria and processes and determining the CCIF’s composition and governance arrangements.
Table 7 below reflects the Objective, Outcome/s and Outputs of this Strategic Lever. The key activities are detailed in the National Implementation Plan which accompanies this revised White Paper.
Table 7: Objective, Outcome/s and Output- Cultural and Creative Industries Fund Strategic Lever CULTURAL AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES FUND OBJECTIVE To consolidate and increase the financial resource base for ACH through a single fund that will equitably support non-governmental ACH institutions and the Cultural and Creative Industries in general. OUTCOME/S  ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries developed, promoted and protected. SOME OUTPUTS (See National Implementation Plan)
 CCIF Model developed
 CCIF established
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16.6 Cultural Diplomacy
The DAC’s 2009 discussion document on South African Living Heritage quotes Cummings M.C. in describing Cultural Diplomacy as “the exchange of ideas, information, art, lifestyles, value systems, traditions, beliefs and other aspects of culture, with the intention of mutual understanding”. Cultural diplomacy recognises and understands foreign cultural dynamics. It has been by countries around the world to promote and protect their interests by developing an understanding, among foreign nations, of the country’s ideals, institutions, way of life, economic and political goals. Cultural Diplomacy can be described as a two-way process that creates influence by exposing and attracting nations to the soul of other countries.
In terms of the definition of cultural diplomacy, it is clear that this is an important aspect of international relations and thus is led by government. However, other sectors of society have an important role to play in cultural diplomacy because it is these sectors, and not government, which creates culture. Government manages the international environment by utilising and creating awareness of its cultural sources and achievements, to win support that will ultimately have a positive impact on national policies and programmes.
Cultural diplomacy seeks to induce greater co-operation between two nations; aid in changing the policies or political environment of the target nation; prevent, manage and mitigate conflict with the target nation, develop a positive view of the country’s people, culture and policies; increase tourism and investment opportunities. It also helps a country to better understand the foreign nation it is engaging with and consequently improves collaboration through mutual understanding and respect. Cultural diplomacy has the added advantage of reaching so called ordinary people outside of the traditional international relations circuit. It also has the potential to demonstrate national power, create an environment conducive to support, and assist in the collection and interpretation of information. This, in turn, aids in the interpretation of intelligence, enhances a nation’s prestige and aids in garnering support for policies abroad. All of these factors affect a nation’s security, thus, cultural diplomacy has an effect on, and a role to play, in regards to national security.
There are several ‘tools’ that can be used to facilitate cultural diplomacy. Some of these are:
 The arts including films, dance, music, painting, sculpture, etc.
 Exhibitions which offer the potential to showcase numerous objects of culture.
 Educational programs such as universities and language programs abroad.
 Exchanges- scientific, artistic, educational etc.
 Literature- the establishment of libraries abroad and translation of popular and national works.
 Broadcasting of news and cultural programs.
 Gifts to a nation, which demonstrates thoughtfulness and respect.
 Religious diplomacy, including inter-religious dialogue.
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 Promotion and explanation of ideas and social policies.
The immense benefits that can be gained from cultural diplomacy have led to some countries establishing institutions to promote their culture. Examples of this are the British Council, the French Cultural Institutes, the Goethe Institute in Germany and the Japan Foundation.
While South Africa has made remarkable progress since the advent of democracy to advance its rich and diverse ACH, this has not been done in a sustainable and coherent manner. Nor has the extent to which cultural diplomacy can promote regional, continental and international collaboration and integration; and contribute to world peace and harmony, been fully explored. Cultural Diplomacy is yet to be specified in South Africa’s international relations and co-operations policies, and factored into the structuring of its embassies and consulates.
The DAC will work in partnership with the Department of International Relations and Co-operation to ensure that cultural diplomacy is embedded in South Africa’s international relations policies, programmes and institutions. To enhance institutional capacity internationally to promote South Africa, the DAC will pursue the appointment of cultural attachés in South African embassies as a matter of urgency. The cultural attachés will have clear reporting lines to both the DAC and the Department of International Relations and Cooperation. The DAC will also work with other relevant departments such as the Department of Tourism and Sport and Recreation South Africa (SRSA) and organisations such as SATOUR and the International Marketing Council to develop and implement cultural diplomacy programmes and projects that promote South African culture.
To systematically co-ordinate cultural diplomacy initiatives, the DAC will establish a focused Cultural Diplomacy Unit attached to the Office of its Director-General. The work of the Unit will be politically and strategically guided by the Minister of Arts and Culture. The broad mandate of the Unit will be to:
 Identify areas of priority within the region, continent and internationally for cultural diplomacy initiatives;
 Promote ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries in a manner that strengthens foreign policy and economic diplomacy;
 Take stock of ACH similarities with, and differences from, other countries in order to contribute to the body of knowledge in South Africa about the ACH of those countries;
 Facilitate exchange programmes on ACH between South Africa and other countries;
 Monitor South Africa’s alignment with international ACH conventions and protocols;
 Co-ordinate and manage inter-departmental and multi-stakeholder processes, task teams and meetings; and
 Perform its tasks through working with South African embassies and all other relevant stakeholders.
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Table 8 below reflects the Objective, Outcome/s and Outputs of this Strategic Lever. The key activities are detailed in the National Implementation Plan which accompanies this revised White Paper.
Table 8: Objective, Outcomes and Outputs- Cultural Diplomacy Strategic Lever CULTURAL DIPLOMACY OBJECTIVE To develop and sustain a positive image of South Africa’s rich and diverse ACH across the continent and internationally. OUTCOME/S Increased participation of South Africa’s ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries in the global community and positive relations between South Africa and other countries. SOME OUTPUTS (See National Implementation Plan)
 Cultural Attaches appointed
 Dedicated Cultural Diplomacy Unit established in DAC
 International Exchange Programmes
 Festivals and Programmes of other countries supported
 ACH sector and sub-sector collaboration facilitated
 Technology exchange and transfer programme
 Bi-lateral Agreements signed
 Partnerships established
16.7 Skills Development and Arts Education
The growth, effectiveness, transformation, protection, preservation and sustainability of ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries is dependent on the existence of skilled and experienced ACH practitioners and human resource capacity to generate and deliver AHC offerings.
This Strategic Lever has two main focus areas. One is developing ACH practitioners and the human resource capacity of the Cultural and Creative Industries to perform all the tasks that make up the full cycle of activities in its value chain, i.e. creation, production, dissemination, exhibition/ reception/ transmission and consumption/participation. The other is developing and increasing an interest in the ACH Value chain of activities at an early stage by offering Arts Education in schools, including in early childhood development institutions. Both focus areas allow for systematic mainstreaming of youth, women and persons with disabilities as well as for the desired demographic transformation of the sector.
The DAC’s Heritage Human Resource Development Strategy, developed on the basis of a heritage skills audit, identified the scarce skills in the sector and provides recommendations on how to develop and retain these skills. According to the report, a total of 35 skills were found to be scarce and 19 critical skills were identified. The report collated the scare and critical skills in total of 41 Priority Skills. The
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recommendations of the report include the formation of appropriate linkages with existing initiatives such as the Sector Education Training Authorities (SETAs) and the National Qualification Framework (NQF) and a bursaries programme. In 2011, the DAC awarded bursaries to 31 students serving in the fields of Archaeology, Museology, Curatorship, Anthropology, Heritage and Cultural Tourism. The number of bursaries in these fields of studies was raised to 71 in 2012. SAHRA has established a Centre for Training, Research and Education (Centre) to address the need for on-going occupationally directed professional development in the heritage sector.
The career options straddling ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries is vast and ranges from specific forms of individual or group artistic or creative expressions to town planners, architects and geologists. Additional work and skill development opportunities reside in Arts schools, Further Education and Training Institutions, private training institutions, ACH institutions such as museums and art galleries. Each sector and sub-sector that is still to be developed will reflect the detailed skills development strategies and interventions that will apply to meet its specific human resource capacity needs.
Broadening access to career and skills development opportunities in the ACH will fundamentally impact on efforts to transform the demographic representation of ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries. According to the DAC’s Heritage Human Resources Development Strategy the South African Qualifications Authority Leaners Records 2010 Database showed that in the same year, of the 63 158 people that had attained an academic qualification in a heritage discipline or heritage course as part of a general study programme, Whites accounted for 39 424, “Africans”: 16234, “Coloureds”: 3839, and Indians: 3554.
Arts Education at school level is critical because of the multiple benefits it offers. ACH serves as formal and non-formal vehicles of knowledge and is beneficial as a supplementary educational tool and as a main content or subject of study. Arts education can amongst others, create an understanding of the importance of ACH, an acknowledgement of and respect for cultural diversity, reinforce behavior that is critical to social cohesion and support balanced intellectual, emotional and psychological development of individuals and societies. The introduction of Arts Education to children (especially at early childhood development stage) strengthens cognitive development, innovative and creative thinking, critical reflection and communication skills. It also develops inter-personal skills such as social adaptability; cultural awareness, tolerance, acceptance and appreciation of others and the building of personal and collective identities. Finally introducing ACH to children in the form of Arts education can increase their interest as future consumers and/or as producers of ACH as well as in the career opportunities that exist in ACH and the Creative and Cultural Industries.
Table 9 below reflects the Objective, Outcome/s and Outputs of this Strategic Lever. The key activities are detailed in the National Implementation Plan which accompanies this revised White Paper.
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Table 9: Objective, Outcome/s and Output- Skill Development and Arts Education Strategic Lever SKILL DEVELOPMENT AND ARTS EDUCATION OBJECTIVE To increase and sustain the number of ACH practitioners and the pool of human resource capacity required by ACH institutions and the Cultural and Creative Industries. OUTCOME/S  ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries developed, promoted and protected.  Increased number of people and communities experiencing a better life through advancing ACH to all.  Increased levels of economic growth, job creation and economic justice through contributing to socio-economic development.  Transformed ACH institutions and Cultural and Creative Industries that reflect the demographic realities of South Africa as all levels of the ACH Value Chain; and ACH advanced to All. SOME OUTPUTS (See National Implementation Plan)
 Skills Development Programmes implemented
 Arts Education in Schools and ECD centres
 Artists in Schools Schemes
 Research and Development Reports
 National Creative Industries Skills Academy (NaCISA)
16.8 ACH Sector Strategies and Plans
Each main and sub-sector of the Cultural and Creative Industries has its own distinct characteristics. Thus this revised White Paper avoids providing a “one-size fits all” policy statement for the different main and sub-sectors of the Cultural and Creative Industries. Instead, it addresses generic ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries issues, and proposes individual sector and sub-sector strategies be developed that capture the specific details and needs of each main and sub-sector. The detailed strategies will be aligned to this revised White Paper, guide the work of each sector and sub-sector and focus on implementation.
As stated in sub-sector 16.4 of this revised White Paper the DAC will, in the short term, utilize the adapted categorization of the 6 main sectors offered by UNCTAD and proposed in the MGE Strategy and provide for additional sub-sectors that may not have been identified or separated as a stand-alone sub-sector. Changes to the main sectors, if required, will be effected in the medium to long term.
Each sector and sub-sector strategy will address the following key issues:
 About the Sector / Sub-Sector…
– Definition
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– Importance
– Specific Role
 Additional definitions relevant to the sector / sub-sector.
 Current Sector Landscape:
– All institutions/ role-players from all sectors of society.
– All programmes and projects.
– All funding needs
 Purpose of the strategy.
– Areas of alignment with the revised White Paper.
– Areas of Alignment with Continental and International Declarations, protocols, etc.
 Strategic approach to implementing interventions in terms of the 12 Strategic Levers of this revised White Paper.
 Additional sector specific Strategic Levers and Key Result Areas.
 Specific Mandate and Role of Government and other sectors of society.
 Detailed Implementation Plan aligned to the National ACH Implementation Plan.
Examples, rather than a comprehensive list, of specific areas that will be attended to in each sector /sub sector strategy are reflected hereunder. DAC is of the view that detailing the comprehensive list here will defeat and possibly even nullify the rationale for sector specific strategies.
All Main Sector Strategies
All main sector strategies will include a description of each of its sub-sectors and an explanation of how/why the sub-sector falls within this main sector. The strategy will in effect be a consolidation of all its sub-sector strategies and will thus ideally be developed after the sub-sector strategies. A consolidation of the implementation plans of each sub-sector strategy will in effect serve as the implementation plan of a main sector.
Museums
The Museums Strategy will include matters such as:
 The ways in which museums in general are declared, graded, classified, assessed and accredited.
 The naming of key sites, how to deal with offensive names and changing of names.
 Dealing with human remains, and the repatriation of human remains of South African origin, held in collections elsewhere in the world.
 The use of new technologies including digitisation.
 Copyright and reproduction of images and copies.
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Heritage Resource Management Strategy
The Heritage Resource Management Strategy will include matters such as:
 The conservation and management of all South African archaeological sites and material.
 Ensuring that any work which causes disturbance to underwater cultural heritage conforms to accepted archaeological standards and codes of practice.
Living Heritage
The Living Heritage Strategy will include matters such as:
 The promotion and safe-guarding of living heritage as a resource for future generations, enhancing social cohesion at local and national level and providing a sense of identity and continuity within communities, national unity and pride.
 The recognition and celebration of the value of living heritage practices.
 Assisting people to identify and record their heritage and explain the value thereof to communities.
 Co-ordination of living heritage in South Africa and in relation to other countries.
Performing Arts
The Performing Arts Strategy will include matters such as:
 Advancing ACH opportunities for all and especially children, women, youth and people with disabilities.
 Contribution to celebration and commemorative days in the national calendar.
 Expressing norms and values of a transformed, equitable and just society; respect for human rights; the symbiotic relationship between rights and responsibilities and other social issues such as drugs, crime and violence against women and children.
Theatre
The Theatre Strategy will include matters such as:
 Opening up of theatre facilities and resources to a broader spectrum of arts practitioners.
 The production, commission and purchasing of productions.
 Fees for rehearsals at publicly-funded theatres.
 Grading of theatres.
 Audience development
 Existence of companies and ensembles and the relationship of these organisations to government agencies.
Music
The Music Strategy will include matters such as:
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 Developing, promoting and sustaining local, including traditional and indigenous music.
 Increasing exposure of South African artists domestically and internationally.
 Increasing the sales of South African artists domestically and internationally.
 Developing music venues and music productions.
 Online music, Patent, Copyright and Intellectual Property Rights.
 Overcoming piracy.
 The role of various stakeholders in the music industry.
 Manufacturing of music instruments.
Festivals, Rituals and Events
The Festival, Rituals and Events Strategy will include matters such as:
 Facilitating and protecting these cultural expressions and the constitutional alignment thereof.
 Conducting private and sacred ceremonies and spaces for these practices.
Days of Commemoration
The Days of Commemoration Strategy will include matters such as:
 Organising specific commemoration projects.
 Facilitating and increasing citizen’s participation, through ACH, in commemorative events and projects.
 Raising awareness on the role and importance of celebrating commemorative days.
Visual Arts
The Visual Arts Strategy will include matters such as:
 Promoting production, presentation and reception of creative work.
Craft
The Craft Strategy will include matters such as:
 Facilitating the craft sector as an incubator and test marketer of manufacturing ideas for large scale production at later stages.
 Stimulating domestic and international demand for South African visual arts and crafts.
 Engaging the DTI (and its linked agencies) to facilitate access to the DTI financing, incentive and rebate schemes associated SA artists participating in international events.
 Widening access to the experience of and participation in the visual arts, especially of black and women artists and entrepreneurs.
Libraries
The Libraries Strategy will include:
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 The possibility of transforming libraries into digital-based institutions for information delivery (virtual libraries) as one way of addressing the challenge of access and lack of facilities.
 Minimum uniform norms and standards for community libraries and library and information services.
 Promoting general co-ordination and consultation on matters regarding community libraries and library and information services between national, provincial and local government
 Promoting effective co-ordination of strategic planning and budgeting process for community libraries and library and information services provided by provinces and municipalities.
Archives
The Archives Strategy will include matters such as:
 Preserving a national archival heritage for use by the government and people of South Africa.
 Promoting efficient, accountable and transparent government through the proper management and care of government records.
 Actively collecting non-public records of national significance with enduring value.
 Obtaining and preserving films, videotapes and sound recordings of archival value, and to make these available for research and reference purposes.
Language
The Language Strategy will include matters such as:
 Implementing programmes of multilingualism.
 Promoting language professions.
 Coordinating the development of training programmes for language professions.
 Supporting the development of all languages.
 Developing programmes that promote access of information.
 Use of digital technologies.
Publishing
The Publishing Strategy will include matters such as:
 Establishment of a national statutory body to serve as the coordinating and planning institution for the book sector.
 Supporting and developing professional associations such especially freelance authors and freelance community.
 Promoting entrepreneurship and skill development
 Conceptualising and implementing a national reading campaign which is responsive to the diverse needs and interests of the public.
 Advocating and facilitating licensing and fair use of copyright material.
 Making special arrangements for access to content and its reproduction for the visually impaired.
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 Investigating the impact of new technology on copyright and facilitating access.
 Maximise opportunities to increase digital, electronic and corporeal access to books.
Heraldry
The Heraldry Strategy will include matters such as:
 Co-ordination between provincial and national activity in respect of heraldry or national symbols.
 Facilitating an understanding amongst citizens on what is appropriate or inappropriate in relation to the use of national symbols such as the flag, coats of arms, mayoral chains etc.
 Trademark regulations.
 Sanctions for the misuse of national symbols.
Film industry
The Film Industry Strategy will include matters such as:
 Developing high quality film concepts and screenplays.
 Increasing training initiatives for, and competitiveness, of South African films.
 Supporting the growth and distribution of local films.
 Controlling Piracy.
Design, Creative and ACH Technical Support Services
The Design, Creative and ACH Technical Support Services Strategy will include matters such as:
 Raising design and innovation awareness in the country amongst relevant government departments, government agencies, private sector and the public.
 Supporting the participation of South African design in international awards.
 Ensuring that all advertising services and products being advertised comply with all applicable laws and regulations.
Table 10 below reflects the Objective, Outcome/s and Outputs of this Strategic Lever. The key activities are detailed in the National Implementation Plan which accompanies this revised White Paper.
Table 10: Objective, Outcome/s and Outputs- ACH Sector Strategies and Plans Strategic Lever ACH SECTOR STRATEGIES AND PLANS OBJECTIVE To develop and implement sector specific strategies and plans that will address the unique needs and challenges of each sector and its sub-sectors. OUTCOME/S  ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries developed, promoted and protected.
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 Increased number of people and communities experiencing a better life through advancing ACH to all.  Increased levels of economic growth, job creation and economic justice through contributing to socio-economic development.  Increased participation of South Africa’s ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries in the Global Community; and positive relations between South Africa and other countries  Transformed ACH institutions and Cultural and Creative Industries that reflect the demographic realities of South Africa as all levels of the ACH Value Chain; and ACH advanced to All. SOME OUTPUTS (See National Implementation Plan)
 Six (6) x main sector strategies and plans
 Adopted sub-sector strategies and plans
16.9 Sustaining ACH and the Creative and Cultural Industries
Creating and developing an appreciation and respect for ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries, increasing consumption of ACH, and upholding the rights and responsibilities of ACH practitioners is critical to the survival and sustainability of ACH; and to harnessing its valuable contribution to socio-economic development.
In terms of this strategic lever, ACH practitioners will be supported to explore and enhance their creative expressions, as individuals and as part of a broader community and nation. The development and/or adaptation of minimum employment standards and norms that is responsive to the specific needs of ACH practitioners in respect of their working conditions, will be explored. Attention will be given to improving the legal and economic conditions within which ACH practitioners operate and which can enhance creativity and innovation. Increased access to existing social protection schemes will be facilitated and the possibility of tax rebates and other taxation benefits will be considered.
Theatres, Galleries and Museums will be supported to attract and develop new audiences and markets. This relates to the opening up of facilities and resources to a broader spectrum of arts practitioners and the general public. It further relates to the development of new programmes or artistic forms that would appeal to greater audiences and broader market as well as preservation of knowledge and histories particularly in peri-urban and semi-rural areas.
The need to protect and preserve our ACH artifacts for current and future generations will be inculcated as a key responsibility of all, and innovative ways of protecting and preserving ACH artifacts without compromising access will be generated. The protection of copyright, intellectual property, patents and measures to address piracy will be prioritized.
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Table 11 below reflects the Objective, Outcome/s and Outputs of this Strategic Lever. The key activities are detailed in the National Implementation Plan which accompanies this revised White Paper.
Table 11: Objective, Outcome/s and Outputs- Sustaining ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries Strategic Lever SUSTAINING ACH AND THE CULTURAL AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES OBJECTIVE To sustain and grow ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries OUTCOME/S  ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries developed, promoted and protected  Increased number of people and communities experiencing a better life through advancing ACH to all.  Increased levels of economic growth, job creation and economic justice through contributing to socio-economic development.  Increased participation of South Africa’s ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries in the Global Community; and positive relations between South Africa and other countries  Transformed ACH institutions and Cultural and Creative Industries that reflect the demographic realities of South Africa as all levels of the ACH Value Chain; and ACH advanced to All. SOME OUTPUTS (See National Implementation Plan)
 Sourcing Enterprise established
 National and International Touring Company
 Art Bank established
 ACH employment norms and standards developed
 Anti-Piracy campaign implemented
 Increased access to existing and new resources
 Increased audiences and new markets
 Protection and Preservation of ACH knowledge and histories
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PART 7 – ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
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17 OVERVIEW OF ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
All three spheres of government, DAC’s implementing agencies and councils, all Cultural and Creative Industries sectors and sub-sectors, other properly constituted Cultural and Creative Industries organisations, private Cultural and Creative Industries partners and sponsors are amongst the main role-players involved in the delivery of ACH. This revised White Paper identifies and guides the individual, as well as the inter-related roles, of these main role-players.
17.1 THE DAC
Based on the constitutional governance arrangements of the South African Government, the DAC, headed politically by its Minister and Deputy-Minister is responsible for providing the overall national framework for the Creative Industries and ACH matters. The DAC will thus advise, support and assist provinces and local government to align their policies and programmes to ensure that the Creative Industries sector contributes to specific and general national social and economic development objectives. DAC will play a leading and primary role in planning, designing, implementing, monitoring and evaluating the outcomes and impact in this regard. The DAC will ensure that the Creative Industries remains high on the political agenda of national government and Cabinet, and will table any Creative Industries related legislation for adoption to the National Parliament. The specific responsibilities of the DAC include:
 Implementing this revised White Paper and all other policies and legislation on the Creative Industries and ACH matters.
 Translating this White Paper into Legislation that will ensure compliance.
 Translating this White Paper into implementation strategies and plans.
 Communicating the adopted revised White Paper and its related programmes and projects.
 Engaging with National Treasury officials for sufficient resources to fund the implementation of this revised White Paper.
 Reviewing all ACH legislation, and if necessary, amending these to reflect the policy intent and direction provided in this revised White Paper.
 Costing all projects, programmes and activities to drive planning and implementation.
 Establishing and maintaining the necessary operational and administrative systems to ensure speedy, effective and efficient implementation.
 Informing beneficiaries and other role-players of the ACH services that are available and encouraging the use of these services.
 Working closely with officials from other relevant line function departments and the provincial and local spheres of government.
 Developing additional policies, strategies and guidelines, as may be required, to facilitate implementation of this revised White Paper.
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 Consulting and forming partnerships with role- players from other sectors of society as may be necessary and appropriate as well as international community.
 Championing inter-departmental and intra-departmental implementation.
17.2 The Minister and Deputy-Minister of the DAC
The Minister and Deputy Minister of the DAC serve as its political head. Their role and responsibilities include:
 Politically and strategically guiding its officials, implementing agencies and the Creative Industries sector in general on all ACH matters.
 Serving as the custodian and principal champion of the Creative Industries sector and ensuring that ACH matters is placed and remains high on the agenda of Cabinet and National Parliament.
 Reporting and accounting to Cabinet, Cabinet Sub-Committees, National Parliament, and any other relevant statutory structure, on the Creative Industries sector and ACH matters.
 Ensuring the DG and other senior and middle managers develop and implement programmes and projects to give effect to this revised White Paper and other related government policies and legislation.
 Tabling and overseeing the adoption of policies and legislation by Cabinet and National Parliament.
 Liaising with other relevant political representatives of other national departments; provincial MEC’s and MMC members.
 Ensuring that the Creative Industries sector and ACH matters is on the agenda of all relevant inter-governmental structures and meetings, such as Presidential Co-ordinating Committee.
 Ensuring the establishment of any political, administrative or multi-stakeholder structures that may be required.
 Engaging with National Treasury, private sector partners, donors and other sponsors for adequate resources to achieve the Vision and Outcomes of this revised White Paper.
 Ensuring that Creative Industries sector fulfills its dual socio-economic development role.
 Where necessary, setting a clear transformation agenda and process within the ACH sectors.
17.3 MINMEC
The specific role and responsibilities of this structure include:
 Collaboratively determining policy direction and providing political and strategic leadership on all matters relating to ACH.
 Facilitating and overseeing implementation of this revised White Paper and all other government policies and legislation that impact on the Creative Industries sector.
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 Sharing political and strategic information and views on all aspects of ACH to maintain a national overview of progress, challenges, etc.
 Aligning and co-ordinating the actions of all three spheres of government.
17.4 Technical Management Committee
The specific role and responsibilities of this structure include:
 Facilitating and ensuring the development of appropriate administrative mechanisms and process to implement this revised White Paper, all other relevant government policies and legislation and all decisions of MinMEC.
 Sharing administrative and operational information and views on all aspects of ACH to maintain a national overview of progress, challenges, etc.
 Aligning and co-ordinating administrative actions of all three spheres of government.
 Ensuring clear roles and responsibilities for civil society, private sector and government
 Ensuring international interest in South African ACH.
17.5 Provincial and Local Government
The role of provincial and local government structures will be in compliance with Schedules 4 and 5 of The Constitution (Act 108 of 1996) that indicates the concurrent and exclusive powers of the different spheres of government. Provincial and Local government is responsible for:
 Developing and implementing provincial and local level policies, strategies and plans that are aligned to national imperatives and this revised White Paper.
 Identification of areas of immediate action and results in implementing the revised White Paper.
 Organising and planning provincial, regional, district and local level events.
 Developing sustainable partnerships with provincial and local level role-players from all sectors of society.
 Ensuring that the Creative Industries sector and ACH programmes and projects are included in Provincial Growth and Development Plans as well as local government’s Integrated Development Plans (IDPs).
 Working in collaboration with DAC, its implementing agencies and councils, other properly constituted structures of the Creative Industries sector and any other role-player involved in ACH matters.
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17.6 DAC’s Implementation Institutions
The role and responsibilities of the DAC’s implementation institutions include:
 Implementing, reporting and accounting to the Minister and Deputy Minister of DAC on delegated mandates, individual and joint programmes and projects. This will be done quarterly and will include a written and face-to-face engagement sessions between the Minister, Deputy-Minister and the Executive Committee of each Agency/Council.
 Promoting, advancing and supporting the Cultural and Creative Industries and ACH matters through implementation of this revised White Paper and other related government policies and legislation.
 Serving as an Advisory Board to the Minister, Deputy Minister, MEC’s ad MMC’s on the Cultural and Creative Industries and all ACH matters.
 Facilitating the establishment and strengthening of strategic and sustainable partnerships between various Cultural and Creative Industries sectors and sub-sectors and other role-players.
 Communicating the accessibility of existing infrastructure to the wider arts community.
 Co-ordinating and supporting implementation of this Revised White Paper as well as any DAC or other funding policies that may be developed.
 Promoting and fostering the spirit of co-operation and collaboration amongst all sectors and sub-sectors of the Cultural and Creative Industries as well as with other role players.
 Assisting and co-operating with the DAC and the Cultural and Creative Industries sector and sub-sector organisations to develop and implement programmes and projects.
 In collaboration with DAC, raising additional financial resources for the Cultural and Creative Industries and implementation of ACH matters.
17.7 Provincial and Local Government
Provincial and local level implementation structures have the same roles and responsibilities as the DAC’s Implementing Institutions and Councils, albeit at a provincial or local level. Their role includes implementing mandates delegated to it by the National Council or Agency, and reporting and accounting to them thereon.
17.8 Properly Constituted ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries Organisations
ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries organisations are primarily responsible for implementation of ACH programmes and projects relevant to their Cultural and Creative Industries and sub-Cultural and Creative Industries. As such, they must:
 Create opportunities for enhancing and increasing the cycle of activities, especially consumption and participation.
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 Identify and develop ACH talent from a young age to international standards.
 Facilitate the mainstreaming and inclusion of marginalized sectors of society such as women and people with disabilities, in the main and sub-sectors of the Cultural and Creative Industries.
 Enhance and build the skills base and professional capacity of the Cultural and Creative Industries as a whole.
 Redress past imbalances and champion the transformation of the Cultural and Creative Industries.
 Create a consciousness of the dual social and economic role of the Cultural and Creative Industries and its main and sub-sectors.
 Partner with other role-players to complement and combine skills and other resources required by the Cultural and Creative Industries e.g. tertiary Institutions.
 Ensure that good governance and operations of Cultural and Creative Industries structures.
 Support, work collaboratively with, and if required affiliate to, DAC’s National Implementing Institutions and Councils.
 Assist the DAC and its National Implementing Institutions and Councils with securing additional financial resources for the Cultural and Creative Industries.
 Ensure the development of the Cultural and Creative Industries and the implementation of ACH matters in previously disadvantaged communities.
 Implementing community –based and legacy projects in previously disadvantaged communities.
17.9 Private Sector Partners
The private sector has a critical role to play in enhancing and supporting the Cultural and Creative Industries through interventions such as:
 providing sponsorships for events and Cultural and Creative Industries specific organisations.
 engaging in Public-Private-Partnerships on, for example, upgrading, maintenance and construction of Cultural and Creative Industries infrastructure.
 financing development of the Cultural and Creative Industries and increased participation of marginalized groups such as women, youth and people with disabilities in ACH programmes and projects.
 Aligning their social responsibility programmes to support the Vision and Outcomes of this revised White Paper.
17.10 Educational Institutions
The role and responsibilities of educational institutions include:
 Offering undergraduate, postgraduate, diploma and certificate Cultural and Creative Industries related studies and courses.
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 Designing and implementing workshops and ad hoc courses and providing opportunities for learning to students.
 Assisting with community engagement in terms of talent identification and development.
 Serving as Cultural and Creative Industries academies.
 Making facilities in schools, universities and FET colleges accessible for ACH activities.
 Conducting Cultural and Creative Industries and ACH matters specific research.
 Providing Cultural and Creative Industries bursaries and scholarships.
 Promoting arts education in schools.
17.11 Other Line Function Departments in all 3 Spheres of Government
The Cultural and Creative Industries combines a developmental approach with socio-economic development. This section of this revised White Paper confirms that the Cultural and Creative Industries is both multi-sectoral and multi-disciplinary. A developmental approach purposefully links social and economic policies within a comprehensive state-directed developmental process.
The Cultural and Creative Industries and ACH matters are clearly the mandate of the DAC. However, the structure of government with its various line function departments and its three spheres of government, results in a shared and collective responsibility amongst all departments and spheres of government for the Cultural and Creative Industries. This means that all government departments have a complementary and supportive role to play in ensuring the success of the Cultural and Creative Industries and ACH matters. The role of each department and sphere of government will be specific to its mandate, core functions, powers and responsibilities. Thus, on a practical level, the role of each department can only be clearly defined on a project by project basis depending on the purpose, objectives and the expected outputs and outcomes of the project.
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PART 8 – MONITORING AND EVALUATION
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18 LEVELS OF MONITORING AND EVALUATION (M & E)
This section of the revised White Paper focuses on monitoring and evaluation to determine the impact of implementing this revised White Paper and the attainment of the 18 outcomes listed in section 14.
Qualitative and incremental measures for each outcome, with short, medium and long-term timeframes, will be finalized by the DAC in partnership with relevant role-players, other government departments and the provincial and local spheres of government. The indicators will also be aligned to UNESCO’s Framework for Cultural Statistics.
The DAC will establish the necessary co-ordination structures, mechanisms, processes and systems to fulfill this responsibility. Collaboration and co-operative M & E by all three spheres of government will be facilitated by the DAC, and the provincial and local spheres of government will be encouraged and supported to set up M & E systems that are aligned and feed into the national system managed by the DAC.
Furthermore, the DAC’s Co-ordination and M & E Chief Directorate will ensure that its M & E system is aligned and feeds into the national M & E systems established by the Minister of Monitoring and Evaluation in the Office of the Presidency. It will also be responsible for providing the Office of the Presidency and the Ministry of Women, Children and People with Disability with impact information. The Chief Directorate will maintain and update the M & E indicators and related data.
The information gained from this M & E will be utilized to guide and inform any changes that may be required to this revised White Paper, any related policies, ACH sector strategies, legislation, programs and projects. Since this M & E requires a significant measure of independent and impartial views, it is best managed and conducted by a multi-disciplinary and multi-stakeholder team of people that account and report to the DAC on the processes engaged in and the findings of the process. However, the DAC remains responsible for leading and ensuring that monitoring and evaluation is implemented.
The following table reflects some of the high level broad measures that will be used for each outcome. The indicators in the Table (12) will be further refined and added to, if necessary, by a consultative process led by and involving the DAC and other relevant role-players.
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Table 12: ACH Outcomes and their High Level Broad Indicators OUTCOME HIGH LEVEL INDICATORS
Growth and development of ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries.
 The existence of policies, legislation and regulations that ensures effective transformation, organisation, development, co-ordination, management and provision of ACH.
 The existence of high quality, well-maintained and accessible infrastructure that supports the work, development and growth of the Cultural and Creative Industries.
 ACH talent being identified, nurtured and developed from the youngest possible age as a norm.
 The existence of appropriate, streamlined and transformed institutional arrangements designed for effective and efficient implementation of programmes and projects.
 An increased number of suitably skilled and qualified ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries practitioners meeting the human resource capacity needs of the sector.
 Visible alignment of work between government, ACH institutions and all Cultural and Creative Industries role-players (number of structures, meetings, joint programmes and projects).
 Enhanced co-operative governance between DAC, provincial and local government structures and government departments (number of structures, meetings, joint programmes and projects).
 The implementation of holistic and integrated programmes.
 Decrease in specific challenges experienced by the sector at the various levels of the ACH Value Chain of activities.
 Growing understanding and importance of ACH.
 Partnerships built with tertiary institutions to develop and offer ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries related studies.
 Artists capacitated in community development work.
 Arts education implemented in all schools.
 Implementation of projects that promote, protect and preserve ACH, including indigenous forms of ACH, without compromising access to all.
Increased number of people and communities experiencing a better life through the advancing of South Africa’s rich and diverse ACH to all.
 The existence of high quality, well-maintained and accessible infrastructure that supports ACH offerings in urban, semi-urban and rural areas.
 The number/percentage of communities that display higher levels of inclusion, social cohesion, social justice and social solidarity.
 Reduction in social ills such crime, drug addiction, etc.
 Increased numbers of previously disadvantaged individuals and communities having access to and participating in ACH.
 Removal of barriers that prevent the active participation of women, youth, children and persons with disabilities in ACH.
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OUTCOME HIGH LEVEL INDICATORS
 The number of ACH programmes and projects being implemented in previously disadvantaged communities including in rural and semi-urban areas.
 Increased levels of moral regeneration and national consciousness.
 Implementation of focused projects such as Arts, Socio-Economic & Youth Programme, Arts in Correctional Services, Art Therapy Centres, Community Based and Legacy Heritage projects.
 Higher levels of active citizenship and citizen responsibility through for example, participation in community police forums.
 Removal of barriers that prevent the active participation of women, youth and persons with disabilities in the economy of the Creative and Cultural Industries.
 The number of ACH programmes and projects targeting previously disadvantaged individuals and communities.
 Reduction in reports of exclusion.
 ACH integrated into architecture, urban design and planning.
 The existence of libraries in every ward.
Increased levels of economic growth, job creation and economic justice through positioning ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries at the core of socio-economic development.
 Preferential Procurement policies and practices of ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries role-players.
 Support to, and investment in, ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries SMMEs and co-operatives.
 The amount/percentage contribution to economic growth/GDP through the provision ACH, and by ACH institutions and the Cultural and Creative Industries.
 The number of short, medium and long term jobs created in general.
 The number of jobs created for previously disadvantaged people.
 The number of jobs created for youth, women and persons with disabilities.
 The number of SMME and BB BEE companies contracted or sub-contracted to perform outsourced functions.
 Increased access to markets and development opportunities.
 Lower costs of doing business.
Increased participation of South Africa’s ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries in the global community; and positive relations between South Africa and other countries.
 Number of international ACH events that SA participates in.
 Data showing increased competitiveness.
 Increased access to international markets and development opportunities.
 New international partnerships built and existing ones strengthened
Transformed ACH institutions, and Cultural and
 Number/and or percentage of previously disadvantaged individuals that own and manage institutions
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OUTCOME HIGH LEVEL INDICATORS
Creative Industries that reflect the demographic realities of South Africsa, at all levels of the ACH Value Chain.
and productive assets.
 Number/and or percentage of previously disadvantaged individuals employed at all occupational levels and categories.
 Skills Development of increased percentage of previously disadvantaged individuals; women; persons with disabilities and youth.
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ANNEXURE A
NATIONAL ACH IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
This National Implementation Plan reflects the programmes and projects that realise the policy intent of this Revised White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage.
The Plan is a high level document that will be complemented by detailed ACH sector and sub-sector strategies and plans that are aligned to this Revised White Paper.
It will be implemented by the DAC, in partnership with its equivalents at the provincial and local spheres of government and all ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries role players from all other sectors of society. Non-governmental and private sector institutions will ideally utilise this Plan as a base for developing their individual strategic and implementation plans to ensure that advancing ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries is aligned, integrated and holistic, pools limited resources and strengthens partnerships between various delivery and implementation partners.
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STRATEGIC LEVER 1: ENABLING POLICY, LEGISLATIVE AND REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT OBJECTIVE: To facilitate implementation and actualization of the policy intent of this Revised White Paper by translating it into legislation and regulations OUTCOME/S:  ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries developed, promoted and protected.  Increased number of people and communities experiencing a better life through advancing ACH to all.  Increased levels of economic growth, job creation and economic justice through contributing to socio-economic development.  Increased participation of South Africa’s ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries in the global community; and positive relations between South Africa and other countries. Main Activities Outputs Responsibility Implementation Partners
Revise/Develop and adopt provincial specific ACH policies that are aligned to this revised White Paper
9 x Adopted Provincial ACH Policies
Provincial Government
DAC
Provincial role-players
Revise/Develop and adopt local government specific ACH policies that are aligned to this revised White Paper
Adopted local government policies
Local Government
DAC
Provincial Government
Local level role-players
Audit all existing national legislation against the Revised White Paper in respect of relevance and continuity
Legislation Audit Report
DAC
State Law Advisors
Sector role-players
Based on Audit findings, repeal obsolete legislation
Legislation repealed
DAC
State Law Advisors
Cabinet
Parliament
Develop and adopt new legislation and regulations and/or amend existing legislation which is still relevant
ACH & Cultural and Creative Industries Legislation and Regulations, e.g.
 Copyright
 Intellectual Property
 Patents
DAC
State Law Advisors
DBoE
DHE
DTI
SARS
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 Tax rebates i.r.o. support to ACH
 Importing and exporting ACH
 Investment in ACH
 Arts Education in Schools
 ACH & Cultural and Creative Industries Skills Development
 Cultural Diplomacy as part of Foreign Policy and Legislation
 Working conditions of ACH practitioners
 Providing for ACH when developing human settlements
 Utilisation of ACH infrastructure
Dept. of Housing
Dept. of International and Co-operation and Relations
DoL
Cabinet
Parliament
Sector role-players
ACH Sector and Sub-Sector Strategies
See Strategic Lever 8 below
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STRATEGIC LEVER 2: TRANSFORMATION OF ACH AND THE CULTURAL AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES OBJECTIVE: To ensure: The Cultural and Creative Industries reflects the demographic realities of South Africa, at all levels and across the ACH Value Chain of Activities; and There is increased participation in, enjoyment of and access to ACH. OUTCOME/S: Transformed ACH institutions and Cultural and Creative Industries that reflect the demographic realities of South Africa as all levels of the ACH Value Chain; and ACH advanced to All. Main Activities Outputs Responsibility Implementation Partners
Transformed ACH Institutions and Cultural and Creative Industries that reflect the demographic realities of South Africa
Conduct a Transformation Audit of ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries Institutions
(Develop scope, criteria, timeframe etc. for audit; conduct audit, write audit report with recommendations)
Transformation Audit Report
DAC
Provincial Government
Local Government
ACH Institutions
Cultural and Creative Industries
Sector role-players
Based on Audit findings and recommendations, develop Transformation indicators and targets
(Conduct consultative process to engage on and finalise indicators and targets; Include indicators and targets in transformation charter or as addendum to charter)
Transformation indicators and targets
DAC
Provincial Government
Local Government
ACH Institutions
Cultural and Creative Industries
Sector role-players
Develop and Adopt a Transformation Charter
(Collaborate with relevant stakeholders in drafting a transformation charter, Obtain signatories; Publicise , Review and Monitor adherence to the Charter)
Adopted Transformation Charter
Provincial Government
Local Government
ACH Institutions
Cultural and Creative Industries
Sector role-players
Develop, implement and monitor a Transformation Plan
Adopted Plan
DAC
Provincial Government
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Annual Transformation Reports
Local Government
ACH Institutions
Cultural and Creative Industries
Sector role-players
ACH Advanced to All
Establish “More than you can Imagine” Cultural Precincts (and national calendar) that offer commodities, activities and experiences of ACH – see MGE Strategy for details
(Develop output specification for construction and operational phases of each precinct, financial feasibility study, detailed business plan, etc.)
10 to 20 precincts developed, functional and attracting South African and foreign visitors
“More than you can Imagine” national calendar of events
DAC
Provincial Government
Local Government
Dept. of Public Works
Sector role-players
Establish Information Precincts with virtual museums – see MGE Strategy for details
(Develop detailed concept, implementation plan, identify sites, collaborate with site partners to establish, detailed business plan, financial plan, personnel plan)
Information precincts with virtual museums established, functional and being utilised
Provincial Government
DAC
Local Government
Dept. of Public Works
Sector Role-players
Revise and implement Heritage Legacy Projects – see MGE Strategy for details
(include living heritage in each legacy project, low maintenance and non-opex initiatives through EPWP,
TRC Wall of Remembrance Monument to San
Pre-colonial Heritage
Great Patriots
Women of South Africa Workers of South Africa Forced Removals and Restitutions
Historical Turning Points
The long walk to Freedom – the Mandela trail
Matyrs who fell in the armed struggle
DAC
Provincial Government
Local Government
Dept. of Public Works
Sector Role-players
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Dedicating Libraries Missionary trails
History trial of slaves in the W.Cape
In the footsteps of Gandhi
Cultural mapping of war graves
Centenary of the 1899-1902 war
New Museums
Develop Community Based Heritage Initiatives
(Identify communities, conceptualise and develop initiative, implement, active involvement of community members, maintenance plan involving community members)
At least 1 community based heritage per province to be increased annually
Local Government
DAC
Provincial Government
Sector role-players
Dept. of Public Works
Develop Public Art Spaces
(public art works in public spaces, beautification and storytelling, showcasing artistic talent)
Public Art Spaces established and functional
Sector Role-players
DAC
Provincial Government
Local Government
Dept. of Public Works
Establish a Library and multi-functional Community Arts Centre in every ward
Library and community art centre in every ward established, functional and being utilised
Local Government
DAC
Provincial Government
Sector role-players
Dept. of Public Works
Develop and implement projects for all commemorative days
Commemorative day celebrations well attended
DAC
Provincial government
Local government
Sector role-players
Governance and Implementation Institutions
See Strategic Lever 4
Cultural and Creative Industries Fund
See Strategic Lever 5
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Skills Development and Arts Education
See Strategic Lever 7
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STRATEGIC LEVER 3: INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND MAINTENANCE OBJECTIVE: To ensure the development and maintenance of ACH infrastructure that can support local, regional, national and international ACH offerings as well as increase participation in, and access to ACH OUTCOME/S:  ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries developed, promoted and protected.  Increased number of people and communities experiencing a better life through advancing ACH to all.  Increased levels of economic growth, job creation and economic justice through contributing to socio-economic development.  Increased participation of South Africa’s ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries in the global community; and positive relations between South Africa and other countries. Main Activities Outputs Responsibility Implementation Partners
Conduct an ACH Infrastructure Audit
(Assess condition, advise on renovations/refurbishments and integration of ACH in urban design and planning of human settlements, engage with role-players to identify needs, advise on alternative infrastructure options, green technologies for infrastructure)
Audit Report with recommendations
DAC
Provincial Government
Local Government
Sector role-players
Community based ACH organisations
Dept. of Public Works
Develop and implement an ACH Infrastructure Maintenance Plan
(Collaborate with and involve relevant stakeholders and role-players. Establish community-based maintenance teams)
ACH infrastructure maintenance plan
Infrastructure maintained according to plan
DAC
Provincial Government
Local Government
Sector role-players
Community based ACH organisations
Dept. of Public Works
Based on audit findings, build new ACH infrastructure
(Appoint transaction advisor for PPP investigation and feasibility studies for all required new infrastructure; use
New infrastructure built
DAC
Provincial Government
Local government
Sector-role players
Private sector partners
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labour intensive construction methods where possible)
Construction companies
Facilitate the inclusion of culturally influenced design and locally produced cultural pieces and artefacts into new residential and commercial developments
Integration of Arts, Culture and Heritage artefacts into residential and commercial developments.
Sector Role-Players
DAC
Provincial government
Local government
Other relevant government departments
Private sector partners
Infrastructure developers
Construction companies
Infrastructure related to Specific Projects
See Strategic Lever 2 – ACH advanced to All STRATEGIC LEVER 4: GOVERNANCE AND IMPLEMENTATION INSTITUTIONS OBJECTIVE: To ensure that the DAC’s governance and institutional arrangements:  Enable integrated and holistic implementation of this revised White Paper;  Is streamlined to reflect prudent use of limited resources; and  Reflects good and effective governance OUTCOME/S:  ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries developed, promoted and protected. Main Activities Outputs Responsibility Implementation Partners
Audit role and functions of current structures
(Identify gaps and duplication in functions; list all functions, assess reporting, accountability, operational systems, etc.)
Structure Audit Report
DAC
Provincial Government
Local Government
Current DAC institutions
Establish new institutions reflected in this White Paper
(Terms of reference for functioning, composition, legislation to establish, mandate and role, formation of sub-committees, etc.)
6 x National DAC Institutions
DAC
Provincial Government
Local Government
Sector role-players
Current DAC institutions
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Repeal / Amend / Develop new legislation relating to DAC institutions
See Strategic Lever 1
Revised White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage
Final Version (October 2013) 96 | P a g e
STRATEGIC LEVER 5: CULTURAL AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES FUND (CCIF) OBJECTIVE: To consolidate and increase the financial resource base for ACH through a single fund that will equitably support non-governmental ACH institutions and the Cultural and Creative Industries in general OUTCOME/S:  ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries developed, promoted and protected. Main Activities Outputs Responsibility Implementation Partners
Audit existing DAC funding institutions to ascertain what works, where the gaps are, what needs to change, etc. with view of incorporating best practice in developing the CCIF
Audit Report
DAC
Provincial Government
Local Government
National Treasury
DAC Funding institutions
Develop a model for, and establish the CCIF
(Investigate international best practice ACH funding institutions, use findings of audit report and international research to develop model, present different options and organisational models, establish the preferred legal entity)
Adopted CCIF Model
CCIF established and functional
DAC
Provincial Government
Local Government
National Treasury
Donor agencies
Private sector partners
Lotto
Other Funders
Develop and implement a fundraising strategy and plan
Adopted fundraising strategy and plan.
Amount of Funds raised
CCIF
DAC
Provincial government
Local government
National Treasury
Develop, main and update a donor/funder database
Database established, functional and being utilised
CCIF
DAC
Provincial government
Local Government
Revised White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage
Final Version (October 2013) 97 | P a g e
National Treasury
Donor agencies
Private sector partners
Lotto
Other Funders
Develop and implement fund raising and disbursement policies, systems and processes, including distribution formula, funding criteria, etc.
Operational and disbursement systems and processes reflect good, transparent and fair practices
CCIF
DAC
Provincial government
Local government
National Treasury
Repeal / Amend / Develop new legislation relating to DAC funding institutions such as the NAC
See Strategic Lever 1
Revised White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage
Final Version (October 2013) 98 | P a g e
STRATEGIC LEVER 6: CULTURAL DIPLOMACY OBJECTIVE: To develop and sustain a positive image of South Africa’s rich and diverse ACH across the continent and internationally OUTCOME/S: Increased participation of South Africa’s ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries in the Global Community; and positive relations between South Africa and other countries Main Activities Outputs Responsibility Implementation Partners
Collaborate with Department of International Relations and Co-operation to appoint Cultural Attaches
(Develop job description and post level, advertise, appoint, etc.)
Cultural Attaches appointed in every embassy/consulate
DAC
Department of International Relations and Co-operation
National Treasury
Establish a dedicated Cultural Diplomacy Unit in the DAC
(Structure, functions, staffing, reporting and accountability, operational expenses, etc.)
Unit established and functioning effectively
DAC
Department of Public Service and Administration
Department of International Relations and Cooperation
National Treasury
Provincial Government
Local Government
Develop and implement a Cultural Exchange Programme
(Exchange programme, festivals, facilitate collaboration, agreements and partnerships established, continental inclusion in local festivals, Create an inter-continental cultural comparison festival, etc.)
International Exchange Programmes
Participation in Festivals and programmes
Partnerships established
Bi-lateral agreements signed and implemented
New international markets and increased consumption of South African consumption of ACH
DAC
Department of International Relations and Co-operation
Provincial Government
Local Government
Department of Tourism
Department of Home Affairs
National Treasury
Sector role-players
ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries practitioners
Revised White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage
Final Version (October 2013) 99 | P a g e
Private sector partners
Donors
Facilitate ACH technology exchange and transfer
(Submit innovations and developments to international/continental partners; Invite collaboration with development of new technology; Create an exchange program for the technology sector; Provide reward and recognition awards for participants; Encourage joint ventures to exploit knowledge contributions to new developments.)
New technology project developments.
Increase in technology exchanged.
Rewards and recognition awards issued.
Increase in new joint ventures.
DAC
Department of International Relations and Cooperation
Department of Home Affairs
Department of Science and Technology
Sector role-players
Private sector institutions
Repeal / Amend / Develop new legislation relating to Cultural Diplomacy
See Strategic Lever 1
Revised White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage
Final Version (October 2013) 100 | P a g e
STRATEGIC LEVER 7: SKILLS DEVELOPMENT AND ARTS EDUCATION OBJECTIVE: To increase and sustain the number of ACH practitioners and the pool of human resource capacity required by ACH institutions and the Cultural and Creative Industries\ OUTCOME/S:  ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries developed, promoted and protected.  Increased number of people and communities experiencing a better life through advancing ACH to all.  Increased levels of economic growth, job creation and economic justice through contributing to socio-economic development.  Transformed ACH institutions and Cultural and Creative Industries that reflect the demographic realities of South Africa as all levels of the ACH Value Chain; and ACH advanced to All. Main Activities Outputs Responsibility Implementation Partners
Implement appropriate capacity building and skills development programmes
(Conduct audit of existing capacity, identify training and development needs, Design training initiatives, Conduct accredited training, etc.)
Audit Report
Training needs report
Training courses
Training reports
On-the-job training programmes
Mentorships
Learnerships
Internships
Sector role-players
Tertiary institutions
Cultural and Creative Industries
ACH institutions
DAC
Provincial Government
Local Government
Department of Higher Education
Department of Labour
SETA’s
SAQA
Develop, maintain and update an ACH and Cultural and Creative Industries Database
(develop and maintain a database of volunteers, ACH training institutions, ACH practitioners, cultural and creative industries institutions, etc. that can be accessed and utilised by all role-players involved in advancing ACH and the Creative and Cultural Industries and that may require this capacity)
Database established, functional and utilised
DAC
Provincial government
Local government
Sector role-players
ACH practitioners
Training institutions
Volunteers
Cultural and Creative Industries
Revised White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage
Final Version (October 2013) 101 | P a g e
In partnership with tertiary institutions and the sector training authority determine unit standards for career pathways
Accredited career pathways
Partnerships established with tertiary institutions
DAC
Sector role-players
Department of Higher Education
SETA’s
SAQA
Establish and implement ACH practitioner Development Pathways
(Identify the range and quality of support services required for talented ACH Practitioners, Identify the service providers for each stage of the development pathway, Create a support structure, define roles, responsibilities and resourcing contributions of key stakeholders, etc.)
ACH practitioners progressing through the development pathway
Sector role-players
DAC
Provincial government
Local government
Department of Higher Education
Training institutions
SETA’s
Develop and implement projects that identify and nurture ACH talent and potential from a young age
No of young people identified developed as ACH practitioners
Sector role-players
DAC
Provincial government
Local government
Department of Basic Education
Training institutions
SETA’s
In partnership with the DoBE, implement arts education in schools and ECD centres
ACH educators appointed
ACH curriculum updated
DAC
DoBE
Sector role-players
Implement Artists in Schools projects
No of projects implemented
Sector role-players
DAC
DoBE
Artists
Establish a national ACH Research and Development Institution
Institution established and functioning effectively
DAC
Sector role-players
Department of Higher Education
Research institutions
Tertiary institutions
Donors
Revised White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage
Final Version (October 2013) 102 | P a g e
Establish a Centre of Excellence and national Cultural Industries Skills Academy
National Cultural Skills Academy established and functioning effectively
DAC
Sector role-players
Dept. of Higher Education
DoBE
DTI
Department of Labour
Repeal / Amend / Develop new legislation relating to skills development and Arts Education
See Strategic Lever 1
Transformation through skills development and arts education
See Strategic Lever 2
Infrastructure in respect of skills development and arts education
See Strategic Lever 3
Institutional arrangements in respect of skills development and arts education
See Strategic Lever 4
Funding for skills development and arts education
See Strategic Lever 5
International Opportunities for skills development and arts education
See Strategic Lever 6
Specific Sector approaches to skills development and arts education
See Strategic Lever 8
Revised White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage
Final Version (October 2013) 103 | P a g e
STRATEGIC LEVER 8: ACH SECTOR STRATEGIES AND PLANS OBJECTIVE: To develop and implement sector specific strategies and plans that will address the unique needs and challenges of each sector and its sub-sectors OUTCOME/S:  ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries developed, promoted and protected.  Increased number of people and communities experiencing a better life through advancing ACH to all.  Increased levels of economic growth, job creation and economic justice through contributing to socio-economic development.  Increased participation of South Africa’s ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries in the Global Community; and positive relations between South Africa and other countries  Transformed ACH institutions and Cultural and Creative Industries that reflect the demographic realities of South Africa as all levels of the ACH Value Chain; and ACH advanced to All. Main Activities Outputs Responsibility Implementation Partners
Develop sector and sub-sector specific strategies, plans and budgets – as reflected in this revised White Paper
(Establish task team, develop ToR for team, develop draft strategy, consultations, refine and finalise, etc.)
6 x Adopted sector strategies and plans
Adopted sub-sector strategies and plans
DAC
Sector role-players
Provincial government
Local government
Revised White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage
Final Version (October 2013) 104 | P a g e
STRATEGIC LEVER 9: SUSTAINING ACH AND THE CULTURAL AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES OBJECTIVE: To sustain and grow ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries OUTCOME/S:  ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries developed, promoted and protected.  Increased number of people and communities experiencing a better life through advancing ACH to all.  Increased levels of economic growth, job creation and economic justice through contributing to socio-economic development.  Increased participation of South Africa’s ACH and the Cultural and Creative Industries in the Global Community; and positive relations between South Africa and other countries  Transformed ACH institutions and Cultural and Creative Industries that reflect the demographic realities of South Africa as all levels of the ACH Value Chain; and ACH advanced to All. Main Activities Outputs Responsibility Implementation Partners
Establish a Sourcing Enterprise – see MGE strategy for details
(virtual and physical enterprise that enhances access to everything ACH has to offer, stimulates demand for goods and services, increases production, provides support for producers including business support, product development and market access; sourcing commodities activities and experiences for dissemination, supplier of government ACH commodities)
Sourcing Enterprise established
Increased audiences and markets
Sector role-players
DAC
Provincial government
Local government
Artists
Private sector partners
DTI
Investigate the feasibility of establishing a national and international touring company – see MGE strategy for details
(develop a touring programme to precincts and events, access travelling productions and exhibition for audience development, programme for travelling theatre productions, travelling museum exhibitions, rotation of offerings and events)
Feasibility Report
Concept Document
Increased audiences and markets
DAC
Provincial government
Local government
Department of Tourism
National Treasury
Sector role-players
Establish an Art Bank – see MGE Strategy for details
Concept document
Sector role-players
DAC
Revised White Paper on Arts, Culture and Heritage
Final Version (October 2013) 105 | P a g e
(funded commercial venture, procure and curate art works in all public buildings, including SA embassies, auction annually for renewal of displays and on-going interests, financial modelling and concept, detailed business plan, etc.)
Financial modelling
Art Bank Established
Increased audiences and markets
Provincial government
Local government
Artists
Private sector partners
Donors
Develop and implement an anti-piracy campaign
Campaign plan
Campaign reports
DAC
Sector role-players
Provincial government
Local government
Develop ACH employment norms and standards
See Strategic Lever on enabling policy and legislation
Protect and Preserve ACH knowledge and histories
See Strategic Lever on enabling policy and legislation
Increase access to existing and new resources
See Strategic Levers on infrastructure, skills development and arts education, cultural diplomacy and CCIF

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